salvia hispanica


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chia
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chia
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chia

chia

Chia seeds are one of the best sources of essential fatty acids, with 2/3 being Omega 3 (the kind we lack and need the most- these are the fats that protect against inflammation and heart disease). The word chia is derived from the Nahuatl word chian, meaning oily. Chia seeds are better source of omega fatty acids than flaxseeds, and the fiber is not abrasive like flax. Excellent source of fiber, protein, fats, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, copper, niacin and zinc.. Very hydrating in colon- 1 part chia seeds, 9 parts water lasts 2 weeks in fridge. The Aztecs used chia to relieve joint pain and skin conditions. They are tiny seeds like poppy and can be eaten as is, or simply put in water -they go soft on their own and turn into jelly, like a mild instant oatmeal. A thickener that can be added to soups and smoothies. A great cleanser. Great way to start and end your day as a fiber with lots of nutrition. Cleans your heart, arteries while curbing your carb craving. A valued food source to native tribes. Chia is in the mint family. The common one is Salvia hispanica, and there’s also the golden desert chia Salvia columbariae.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
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References in periodicals archive ?
Supplementation of conventional therapy with the novel grain Salba (Salvia hispanica L.) Improves major and emerging cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes.
[7.] Ullah R, Nadeem M and M Imran Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil," Lipids Health Dis.2017;.
Tomas, "Physical properties of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds," Industrial Crops and Products, vol.
Effect of Salba-Chia (Salvia Hispanica L.), an ancient seed, in the treatment of overweight and obese patients with type 2 Diabetes: a double-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial.
Effect of Chia oil (Salvia hispanica L.) rich in omega-3 fatty acids on the eicosanoid release, apoptosis and T-lymphocyte tumor infiltration in a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.
United States Department of Agriculture, "Salvia hispanica L.," Germplasm Resources Information Network (www.arsgrin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?313893) accessed 1 April.
According to chia.org.uk, Chia (Salvia hispanica L) is an annual herbaceous plant, belonging to the mint family, in a group of plants known as "sage." Cultivation of chia may date back as far as 2600 B.C., and it has been part of the staple diet for these many centuries of the Aztec and Mayan nations in Mexico as well as native populations in America's southwest.
Influence of environment on growing period and yield, protein, oil and [alpha]-linolenic content of three chia (Salvia hispanica L.) selections.
This new "super-food" is nothing more than chia seeds (Salvia hispanica L).