sand wave

sand wave

[′san ‚wāv]
(geology)
A large, ridgelike primary structure resembling a water wave on the upper surface of a sedimentary bed that is formed by high-velocity air or water currents. Also known as sand ridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comprehensive fish and sediment sampling effort was conducted at the central San Juan Channel sand wave field, a region where bottom currents have shaped the seafloor geomorphology into a series of successive crests and troughs at depths of 60-80 m to determine sediment associations of Pacific sand lance in offshore waters.
Sand Lance also occur in deep water (>30 m) on sand wave fields in the San Juan Channel (Blaine 2006; Gary Greene, Tombolo Institute, Orcas Island, WA, pers.
Where: H = the sand wave height in meters d = water depth, 0.
2003) outlined how important it is to have more insight into sand wave behavior.
Backed up with literature, this article provides an overview of the sand wave problems and the ways in which they are handled, and suggests possible improvements based on recent scientific progress, (see also [Nemeth, 2003]).
Beluga whale critical habitat, salmon fisheries, 40-foot boulders, 15-foot-tall sand waves along the ocean bottom, strong currents, shallow water close to shore, ice scouring that could expose or damage a pipeline - all present problems best avoided as much as possible as Alaska.
Sediment transport and sand waves will be studied in this highly dynamic area (6 knot currents).
He said the most likely problems encountered off the coast of Anglesey would be 10metre high sand waves and bare rock.
The wind plays indefinitely with the flowing and rippling sand waves.
Helens, for instance, has sand waves near its peak.
She has also published papers on non-linear waves and pattern formation where her study of phenomena such as tidal sand waves and lasers led to practical applications for laying underwater cable and building artificial islands.