Sandarac


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sandarac

[′san·də‚rak]
(mineralogy)

Sandarac

 

a yellow resin obtained by tapping sandarac trees of the family Cupressaceae (cypresses), including Callitris preissi (Australia) and Tetraclinis articulata (North Africa). Sandarac yields a colorless alcoholic lacquer used for coating pictures and impregnating cardboard; the lacquer is also used in photography and in dentistry.

References in periodicals archive ?
The weak symmetric C[H.sub.3] stretching band, with the maximum being placed near 2880 [cm.sup.-1], appears more resolved in Venetian turpentine and colophony with respect to sandarac and Manila copal which present the additional, sharp symmetric C[H.sub.2] stretching band maximum at 2857 [cm.sup.-1].
Moreover, sandarac and Manila copal display an additional weak peak at 4615 which can be attributed to the combination of v(C-O)+ v(C[H.sub.2]) [1].
Chiantore, "Ageing behaviour and analytical pyrolysis characterisation of diterpenic resins used as art materials: Manila copal and sandarac," Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, vol.
Caption: Figure 6: FTIR spectra in the mid-infrared region of the studied diterpenoid resins (black line: sandarac, dark gray line: Manila copal, gray line: colophony, light gray line: Venetian turpentine) using different analysis modes.
Prior to Sandarac and Casa Clara, nonprivity condominium associations frequently sued negligent design professionals for design deficiencies discovered to exist in common area property operated and maintained by the association.(57) Those cases suddenly denied the association's right to pursue damages from design professionals.(58)
This is an especially significant development when considering that prior to Moransais, the Sandarac and Casa Clara decisions limited the association's right to recover design-related damages solely from the developer, which was often an assetless shell corporation.
(13) Before the introduction of FP&L, AFM, Sandarac and Casa Clara, Florida courts recognized the ability of nonprivity third parties to pursue engineers and others for improper design and construction.