sandpaper

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sandpaper,

abrasive originally made by gluing grains of sand to heavy paper sheets. Today sandpaper is made primarily with quartz, aluminum oxide, or silicon carbide grains, and is graded according to the size of the grains. It is used for smoothing and polishing, for removing old paint or varnish, and for otherwise preparing wood surfaces for refinishing or other treatment.

Sandpaper

An abrasive paper, made by coating a heavy paper with a fine sand or other abrasive held in place with glue; used for polishing surfaces and finished work.

sandpaper

[′san‚pā·pər]
(materials)
Paper with abrasive glued to the surface.

sandpaper

A tough paper which is coated with an abrasive material such as silica, garnet, silicon carbide, or aluminum oxide; used for smoothing and polishing; graded by a grit numbering system according to which the highest grit numbers (360 to 600) are used for fine polishing, and the lowest grit numbers (16 to 40) are used for coarse smoothing. Alternatively, sandpaper may be designated by the “0 grade” system, according to which “very fine” includes grades from 10/0 to 6/0, “fine” from 5/0 to 3/0, “medium” 2/0, 1/0, ½ “coarse” 1, 1½, and 2, “very coarse” 2½, 3, 3½, and 4.

sandpaper

1. (formerly) a strong paper coated with sand for smoothing and polishing
2. a common name for glasspaper
References in periodicals archive ?
The microstructures on the sandpapers and the corresponding epoxy coatings were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, FEI Quanta 250).
In this study, solvent-free epoxy anticorrosive coatings were prepared via a soft lithography method to obtain surface microstructures similar to sandpapers (Scheme 2).
Figure 2 shows the contact angles of a 5 [micro]L water droplet on PDMS templates obtained by different sandpapers and their corresponding epoxy coatings.
In Figures 1(i) and 1(l), the protruded SiC microparticles on sandpapers form such overhanging microstructures and are responsible for the increase in hydrophobicity to [[theta].sub.rough] > 90[degrees] on the microstructured epoxy coatings.
Sandpapers with different grit numbers were used to control the groove size on the microstructured coatings.
Based on the results from this work, it can be concluded that fine stylus-type equipment can be used to quantify the surface quality numerically of radial and tangential surfaces of solid wood species as a function of sanding with different sizes of sandpapers. Also, it appears that shear strength of the specimens was not significantly affected by the sanding process as long as grit size of the sandpaper was above 80.
Overall roughness characteristics of the specimens increased as they were sanded with 80-grit sandpaper. Average roughness values of the radial samples sanded with 80-grit sandpaper ranged from 1.21 to 2.5 times higher than those of the radial control samples.
Once samples were sanded with 80-grit sandpaper without regard to grain orientation or species, overall shear strength values increased.
But modern sandpapers are of manmade abrasives as well as natural ones such as flint and granite.
This rule adds to the toil, but if you are planning to stain the wood, it's important to sand all pieces with similar-grit sandpapers. With difficult pieces, it's tempting to stop at a coarser grit than you may have used on an easier piece.
You start with coarse sandpaper, progress through the medium grades, then finish with sandpaper that feels almost as smooth as typing paper.
Top woodworkers vacuum all wood surfaces whenever they switch sandpaper grades, then follow with a pass from a tack cloth or a rag impregnated with mineral spirits.