sans-culotte


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sans-culotte

1. during the French Revolution
a. (originally) a revolutionary of the poorer class
b. (later) any revolutionary, esp one having extreme republican sympathies
2. any revolutionary extremist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence a writer without a patron was literally sans-culotte. Using this as a springboard, Sonenscher takes the reader on a dazzling journey through eighteenth-century debates on the growth of commercial society, public morality, and state reform.
Baudot recorded in his journal that the documents were destroyed as a "blow against the conspiracies against the nation," and that the "sans-culottes" (his designation for members of the club) were afraid that local "aristocrats" would ally with the enemy to defeat the Revolution and "restore the Monarchy." (19) Because it was "aristocrats" the city arrested on 20 August, and "aristocrats" who were suspected of conspiring against the people, the issue is to determine who, in Dijon, they were.
The sans-culotte cap and tri-colour cockade took the place of unregenerate costume.
A Sans-pantalons B Sans-soleils C Sans-culottes D Sans-roulettes 6.
It is difficult not to think of a special sort of sans-culottes, devoid of a soul, drunk on themselves and cruelty.
* Kirsten Greenidge's plays, including Milk Like Sugar, Bossa Nova, and Sans-culottes in the Promised Land, are historical, topical, and known for bringing underrepresented voices to the stage.
Like the mob at the time of the French Revolution, although hardly sans-culottes, all easily led from behind a la Robespierre, distant camp-followers, fanatics and old proselytisers.
(The rebels called themselves the sans-culottes, literally "without knickers.") French women wanted to join the rebels, but the no-pants rule kept them on the sidelines.
Dubbed "sans-culottes satirist" ("the trouserless joker"), showman, extremista and charismatic former comedian (http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/437936/20130221/italy-polls.htm) Beppe Grillo managed to stir a crowd of more than 30,000 people in Milan ahead of this week's election into a rage against Italy's establishment and corrupt political system as part of his "Tsunami Tour".
The restriction focused on Paris because French Revolutionary rebels in the capital said that they wore trousers, as opposed to the knee-breeches, or the "culottes," of the bourgeoisie, in what was coined the "sans-culottes" movement.
E*a ira" for the 21st century, Riley, like the sans-culottes before him, isn't asking the rich and powerful to lend him and his friends an ear, but kindly informing them that, for their sake, now might be a good time to do so.