sans-culotte


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sans-culotte

1. during the French Revolution
a. (originally) a revolutionary of the poorer class
b. (later) any revolutionary, esp one having extreme republican sympathies
2. any revolutionary extremist
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence a writer without a patron was literally sans-culotte.
The context in which the arrests occurred and the vocabulary that had developed since 1789 suggests that a sans-culotte ideology appears to have played a less significant role than local experiences and goals.
The sans-culotte cap and tri-colour cockade took the place of unregenerate costume.
Like the mob at the time of the French Revolution, although hardly sans-culottes, all easily led from behind a la Robespierre, distant camp-followers, fanatics and old proselytisers.
The rebels called themselves the sans-culottes, literally "without knickers.
E*a ira" for the 21st century, Riley, like the sans-culottes before him, isn't asking the rich and powerful to lend him and his friends an ear, but kindly informing them that, for their sake, now might be a good time to do so.
For the heroic sans-culottes, the storming of the royal prison must have been a letdown,.
In truth, it is the middle classes, particularly the lower middle classes, who make revolutions, whether they be the sans-culottes of Revolutionary France, or the ruined small businessmen of Weimar Germany.
This is simplistic: it ignores, for example, the massive counter-revolutionary movements supported by peasants, the independent petit-bourgeois radicalism of the sans-culottes and the patriarchal values of many Jacobin radicals.
Time was when a classical album sleeve featured nothing more risque than a piano leg sans-culottes or a bust of Beethoven.
Although Robespierre, like most of the revolutionaries, was a bourgeois, he identified with the cause of the urban workers, the sans-culottes as they came to be known, and became a spokesman for them.
They date back to the late-1700s and the name is derived from the looser style of trouser worn by French working-class revolutionaries - named the Sans-Culottes (without breeches) - who rejected the aristocracy's tight breeches.