sap gum

sap gum

Wood of gum, 1 from either young trees or the outer portion of logs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sweetgum, sap gum, red gum, alligator-tree, alligator wood, hazel pine, incense tree, liquidambar, satin walnut and star-leaved gum
Usually the heartwood is sold as red gum while the less commercially valuable sapwood is called sap gum.
Red gum and sap gum are not strong enough for use as a structural timber, according to Donald Culross Peattie in his book A Natural History of Trees of Eastern and Central North America.
Sweet gum, red gum, sap gum, alligator-tree, alligator wood, hazel pine, incense tree, liquidambar, satin walnut, star-leaved gum.
The sapwood goes by the names sap gum, and hazel pine -- although this name is also thought to be misleading.
American red gum yields a cream colored sapwood, sold as sap gum. The heartwood, which is pictured on the preceding page, is much more colorful, ranging from pinkish brown to a deep full-bodied red.
Both red gum and sap gum are available in plentiful supply.
Sap gum is a light cream color, ranging to pinkish white.
The sticky sap gums up the scales of marauding snakes that prey on woodpecker young.