lesbian

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lesbian

[′lez·bē·ən]
(psychology)
Pertaining to female homosexuality.
A female homosexual.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fashioning Sapphism: The Origins of a Modern English Lesbian Culture.
While Robic's contextualization of sapphism is fascinating, the real strength of her study lies in close readings of selected poems, and a dense intertextual analysis that shows Baudelaire's influence on the lesbian poetry of writers such as Theodore de Banville, Henri Cantel, Pierre Louys, and especially Paul Verlaine.
See, for example, her 2001 book, Fashioning Sapphism: The Origins of a Modern British Lesbian Culture (Columbia University Press), which examines the social, cultural, and political context of Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness (1928).
Using a variety of approaches, including literary criticism, queer theory, economics, and psychoanalysis, contributors offer sometimes provocative research into the dynamics and histories of lesbianism and Sapphism. In their various ways, the essays interrogate the efficacy of Sapphism as a way to describe the varieties of same-sex love between women during this period.
She writes that 'we like seeing her and Jane billing and cooing together' (23) and, in a reply to a friend, who had just read Mirrlees's novel Madeleine: One of Love's Jansenists (1919), Woolf writes that Mirrlees 'has a passion for Jane Harrison, the scholar: indeed they practically live together.' (24) There are other references to the nature of their relationship: in a letter to Clive Bell, Woolf reports that she is writing a review of Madeleine: 'It's all sapphism so far as I've got--Jane and herself.' (25) In the Autobiography of Alice B.
Nagle focuses on William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, and Mary Shelley as his primary examples of how Romanticism engages Sensibility, drawing in other authors such as Mary Robinson as the main proponent of sapphism, for instance, to show differences in engagements of and continuous practice in Sensibility.
Sapphism on Screen: Lesbian Desire in French and Francophone Cinema.
In this provocative new collection of essays, editors Laura Doan and Jane Garrity trace the emergence of "sapphism" as an identity category during the modern interwar period, an identity category they contend "played a constitutive role in the construction of a specifically modern understanding of female sexuality" (4).
This year's winner in the Lesbian Fiction category was The Night Watch, Sarah Waters' fever-charged imagining of Victorian-era Sapphism. Children's/Young Adult winner, Between Mom & Jo, by Julie Anne Peters, depicts the experience of a teenage boy caught in the middle of his mothers' breakup, touching upon little-discussed experiences of children in same-sex divorces.
A full-color 1936 ad for Congoleum Gold Seal Rugs shows what could be the sterner side of sapphism. "The smartly designed rug not only provides gaiety and charm but years of labor-saving service," reads the caption below a large photo of two women and a dog in a kitchen.
Susan Lanser's "Bluestocking Sapphism and the Economies of Desire" devotes considerable attention to desire.