saprobic


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saprobic

[sə′prō·bik]
(botany)
Living on decaying organic matter; applied to plants and microorganisms.
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Trophic relationships of ciliated Protozoa developed under different saprobic conditions in the periphyton of the Sava River.
1 Candida 30 66.66% 2 Aspergillus 9 20.00% 3 Saprobic fungi 6 13.33% Table 5: Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacterial pathogens of Chronic Otitis Media SL.
alternata, is a ubiquitous, facultatively plant-pathogenic or saprobic species known to produce allergenic airborne conidial spores (Sanchez and Bush 2001).
The mycelium that you find may belong to either mycorrhizal fungi or saprobic fungi that live on dead organic matter.
Identification and quantification of these rotifers and comparing this to the saprobic index indicated the water to be moderately to heavily polluted at the time (Foissner, 1992; Sladecek, 1983) (Table 4).
If we didn't have saprobic fungi, Earth would be buried in hundreds of feet of accumulated plants that can only be broken down by these fungi.
Recently, reports have surfaced that saprobic fungi, as well as fungi pathogenic for plants, have evolved as human pathogens; reported cases have involved skin infections, endocarditis, brain abscess, onychomycosis, keratitis, mycetoma, bronchopulmonary disease, and rhinosinusitis.
Members of the microascaceae, is reported in previous studies of this family pyrenomycetes [5] are considered to be saprobic and they are found predominately on dung.
This fungus is a common, cosmopolitan, saprobic fungus, however, isolated from many types of terrestrial environments, including soils from Alaska to the tropics: It also has been cultured from subtropical marine waters near the Bahamas and the Straits of Florida, and has been found in eulittoral zones and oceanic zones, including isolations from waters collected as deep as 4,450 m (13,350 ft).
This view covers not only predation, but competition for sunlight (as when one plant shades out another, taking biomass that would, in effect, have been accumulated by the shaded plant), and saprobic activity of fungi and bacteria.