sarsaparilla


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Related to sarsaparilla: sarsaparilla root, sassafras

sarsaparilla

(särs'pərĭl`ə, săs'–), common name for various plants belonging to two different classes and also for an extract from their roots, formerly much used in medicine and in beverages. True sarsaparilla is obtained from various tropical American species of the genus Smilax (which also includes the greenbrier) of the family Smilacaceae, sometimes joined in the Liliaceae (lilylily,
common name for the Liliaceae, a plant family numbering several thousand species of as many as 300 genera, widely distributed over the earth and particularly abundant in warm temperate and tropical regions.
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 family). These have thick rootstalks and thin roots several feet long. Other plants used as substitutes for sarsaparilla include the wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis, although S. glauca also bears that name) and the American spikenard (A. racemosa), both North American plants of the family Araliaceae (ginsengginseng
, common name for the Araliaceae, a family of tropical herbs, shrubs, and trees that are often prickly and sometimes grow as climbing forms. The true ginseng (Panax ginseng
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 family). The Liliaceae are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Liliopsida, order Liliales. The Araliaceae are in the class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales.
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sarsaparilla

sarsaparilla

The entire plant is edible. The root and leaves make an excellent medicinal tea. Roots and young shoots used historically as food source. Anti inflammatory and blood-cleansing, used for quick relief to skin problems such as psoriasis, eczema, itchiness, gout, rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis and stomach aches. It even helps with impotence and virility issues because of it’s testosterone-like effect on the body. Has progesterone-type effect on women to help with menopause, menstrual problems, PMS and depression. Anti-inflammatory, estrogenic, cholesterol-lowering, anti-stress. Used for asthma, pulmonary issues, rheumatism, stomach aches, cough, cystitis. This is one of the three ingredients in the original root beer recipesarsaparilla, sassafras and birch. May cause stomach upset and temporary kidney problems. Do not take if on medication.

sarsaparilla

[‚sas·pə′ril·ə]
(botany)
Any of various tropical American vines of the genus Smilax (family Liliaceae) found in dense, moist jungles; a flavoring material used in medicine and soft drinks is obtained from the dried roots of at least four species.

sarsaparilla

1. any of various prickly climbing plants of the tropical American genus Smilax having large aromatic roots and heart-shaped leaves: family Smilacaceae
2. the dried roots of any of these plants, formerly used as a medicine
3. a nonalcoholic drink prepared from these roots
4. any of various plants resembling true sarsaparilla, esp the araliaceous plant Aralia nudicaulis (wild sarsaparilla), of North America
References in periodicals archive ?
The report also maps the qualitative impact of various market factors on Sarsaparilla market segments and geographies.
The distribution of the phenolic and crystalliferous idioblasts, the circular arrangement of the primary phloem, and the absence of metaxylem elements in the centre of the structure are also common among other species already described in the literature and have allowed identification of the adulteration of products being sold as sarsaparilla (Soares, 2013).
I ummed and ahhed and recalled sweet shop Sarsaparilla tablets.
The former chief of a soft drink company changed the name of his signature drink from Carlisle's Sarsaparilla to "Root Beer." and much consternation among loyalists ensued.
Along the trail you will find the rare black ash, its wood used to make baskets; the Yellow birch flowers, which is used to make tea; Wild Sarsaparilla with the root used to make tea for an all-purpose medicine; Sweetfern, with the leaves and twigs used to make tea and poultices for the treatment of poison ivy rash and other external sores.
A full chapter is devoted to sarsaparilla and sassafras, old remedies in a new country, and includes true and false sarsaparilla and the search for sassafras.
Behind, doily-clad shelves held glass jars of sweets and brightly-coloured cordials - lime, blackcurrant, sarsaparilla, dandelion and burdock, to name a few.
No liquor is served but you can still get a shot of spiced sarsaparilla. The barber shop with its traditional striped pole advertises baths and cigars, and the opera house still puts on several extravaganzas annually featuring the "Gold Dust Players."
She covers first impressions and improvisations by arriving European settlers; remedies from the bush; sarsaparilla and sassafras; xanthorrhoea the grass-tree medicine; floral emissaries; bush beverages; bush tucker bugs; medicinal and toxic honeys; uniquely Australian flowers, flavors, and fragrance; the aromatic export sandalwood; and the famous Australian gum tree.
Among other attractions, visitors will be able to enjoy crumbly cheese from Cheshire, delicious lamb from North Wales, Sarsaparilla from Lancashire, and coffee from Birkenhead, courtesy of Adams & Russell, Wirral's only coffee roaster.
Inside the store, visitors purchase cider, fresh fruit, fruit butters and jellies locally made from organic ingredients, and variations of Sarsaparilla and Lost Trail Root Beer.