Satrapy

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Satrapy

 

a military-administrative division (province) in the kingdom of the Achaemenids, governed by a satrap. Circa 518 B.C., Darius I divided the kingdom into 20 satrapies, whose boundaries in most cases corresponded to the boundaries of the individual countries that were part of the Achaemenid state, such as Babylonia, Egypt, and Media. The number of satrapies and their boundaries changed often. Each satrapy paid an established tribute and could have its own laws, traditions, and language or languages. The division into satrapies was preserved in the Seleucid, Parthian, and Sassanid states.

References in periodicals archive ?
Certain of his ideas to "Finlandize" the Cold War in Europe got nowhere and strike us today as slightly credulous: will not state power abhor a vacuum; would the Soviets have allowed its satrapies to have slipped so readily from their sphere of influence?
To effectively rule his empire, Darius I introduced a number of administrative measures, two of which were the division of his empire into administrative units, satrapies, over which he placed satraps entrusted with civil authority alone, reserving military authority for another set of officials as a counterpoise to the power of the satraps.
protectorate, akin to Britain's relationship with post-Ottoman Empire satrapies.
Another catalyst for this mutiny was the arrival in Susa of the 30 000 sons of noblemen from the eastern satrapies, known as the Epigonoi (A.
In the United States and its satrapies, awareness will sink in, slowly, painfully, like dripping water on the Western conscience.
As satrapies go, theirs was a rather congenial one.
La crise monte en spirale, les bureaucraties reagissent pour sauver leurs << satrapies >> en prenant des initiatives de purges.
SVN authority was mostly limited to Vietnam's large cities and towns, and the countryside was a patchwork of de facto independent satrapies.
military presence still protects economic interests, notably in Saudi Arabia and other off satrapies, and it may now allow the United States to control Iraq's oil fields, but the extent and duration of that control, and whether it will increase the leverage of the United States over supplies and prices in the world's oil markets, remain highly problematic.
Although I believe Hitler eventually would have sought to reduce all European and Eurasian nations to satrapies of the master race, this is difficult to document.