saturation deficit

saturation deficit

[‚sach·ə′rā·shən ′def·ə·sət]
(meteorology)
The difference between the actual vapor pressure and the saturation vapor pressure at the existing temperature.
The additional amount of water vapor needed to produce saturation at the current temperature and pressure, expressed in grams per cubic meter. Also known as vapor-pressure deficit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2014) found that the SOC saturation deficit, which is the difference between actual SOC storage and SOC saturation, was higher for grassland soils than forest soils, and this difference was correlated with temperature and precipitation.
The specific objectives of this study were to (1) determine bulk soil properties and SOC saturation deficit; (2) quantify soil aggregation, soil fractions, and soil fraction associated C; and (3) identify the factors that drive soil aggregation and soil fractions under grassland, shrubs, and pine forest in two adjacent catchments in Central Otago, New Zealand.
For the monitoring of the water relatio((ns)) of the West Indian cherry plants, three fully expanded leaves were collected located in the middle third of each plant, to determine the relative water content in the leaf limb and the water saturation deficit following the methodology used by Lima et al.
For the relative water content and water saturation deficit, no significant difference (p >0.05) was noted in the treatments (Table 2).
Monsanto 919 performed better in both levels with maximum plant height, leaf area per plant, water potential, osmotic potential, turgor potential and minimum relative saturation deficit, while maize hybrid FH 810 remained sensitive at deficit irrigation (75% field capacity).
Turgor pressure was calculated as difference between water potential (psw) and osmotic potential (pss): psp = psw - pss Similarly, 24 DAS relative saturation deficit of 4 leaf from top was collected from each pot at morning time.
In this way, the higher fresh weight reached by 'Pao de Acucar' may be explained by the fact that this cultivar is of the head type, in which inner leaves are protected against environmental factors controlling the plant water flux, such solar radiation and air saturation deficit.
Three leaflets each from 3rd to 5th (top to bottom) leaves of plants were collected from 10 different plants of a genotype from each treatment and used immediately for determination of water saturation deficit (WSD) and EWL.
The moisture status of leaves was determined by the method outlined by Barrs and Weatherley (1962) expressed as water saturation deficit (WSD), which was calculated as follows: