scalar


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Related to scalar: scalar field, scalar product, Scalar waves

scalar,

quantity or number possessing only sign and magnitude, e.g., the real numbers (see numbernumber,
entity describing the magnitude or position of a mathematical object or extensions of these concepts. The Natural Numbers

Cardinal numbers describe the size of a collection of objects; two such collections have the same (cardinal) number of objects if their
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), in contrast to vectorsvector,
quantity having both magnitude and direction; it may be represented by a directed line segment. Many physical quantities are vectors, e.g., force, velocity, and momentum.
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 and tensorstensor,
in mathematics, quantity that depends linearly on several vector variables and that varies covariantly with respect to some variables and contravariantly with respect to others when the coordinate axes are rotated (see Cartesian coordinates).
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; scalars obey the rules of elementary algebra. Many physical quantities have scalar values, e.g., length, area, mass, energy, and electric charge. Such quantities as velocity, force, momentum, and spin are vectors and follow different algebraic rules.

Scalar

 

a quantity such that each of its values can be expressed by a single (real) number. Examples of scalars include length, area, time, mass, density, temperature, and work. The term “scalar” is used—sometimes simply as a synonym for “number”—in vector analysis, where a scalar is distinguished from a vector.

scalar

[′skā·lər]
(computer science)
A single value or item.
(mathematics)
One of the algebraic quantities which form a field, usually the real or complex numbers, by which the vectors of a vector space are multiplied.
(physics)
A quantity which has magnitude only and no direction, in contrast to a vector.
A quantity which has magnitude only, and has the same value in every coordinate system. Also known as scalar invariant.

scalar

1. a quantity, such as time or temperature, that has magnitude but not direction
2. Maths an element of a field associated with a vector space
3. having magnitude but not direction

scalar

(mathematics)
A single number, as opposed to a vector or matrix of numbers. Thus, for example, "scalar multiplication" refers to the operation of multiplying one number (one scalar) by another and is used to contrast this with "matrix multiplication" etc.

scalar

(architecture)
In a parallel processor or vector processor, the "scalar processor" handles all the sequential operations - those which cannot be parallelised or vectorised.

See also superscalar.

scalar

(programming)
Any data type that stores a single value (e.g. a number or Boolean), as opposed to an aggregate data type that has many elements. A string is regarded as a scalar in some languages (e.g. Perl) and a vector of characters in others (e.g. C).

scalar

A single item or value. Contrast with vector and array, which are made up of multiple values. See scalar processor.
References in periodicals archive ?
where the scalar field * and the critical or singular radius B of the K-K solution are simplified as
We describe experimental results and theoretical limitations on using Aligator for generating invariants of programs over scalars and arrays.
It is easier to achieve super-acceleration if 2[omega] + 3 < 0, but this option is not so lucrative since in the Einstein frame, where the tensor and scalar degrees are not mixed, the kinetic energy of the latter is negative, and thus problematic [27].
The ADIC Scalar 100 is a midrange library that offers the industry's leading combination of storage density, trouble-free scalability, and advanced storage networking support.
Quantum, the Quantum logo, Be Certain, Scalar and StorNext are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Quantum Corporation and its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries.
This means that the scalar function [LAMBDA](r, t) is a wave traveling with speed of light.
As it was shown in [24,25] in the case of a scalar damage parameter, the mesoscopic theory leads not only to the definition of damage parameters, but also to equations of motion for them.
According to the principle of interference, the observable Poynting vector is given by the incoherent vector sum of its components in the forward and reverse components, and thus it is impermissible to express the near-zone irradiance of the field as the squared magnitudes of scalar wave functions.
I am delighted that Jeremy has decided to join the Scalar team as a managing director," said Jeron Paul, founding managing director and CEO of Scalar Partners.
Quantum plans to expand Scalar i6000 capacity further in 2016, scaling to more than 15,000 slots, or more than 225PB, in a single system.
As per Sam Sarnicke, Certes VP of Business Development & Americas Sales, "Our partnership with Scalar Decisions will ensure that we can meet the growing demand for network and cloud security in the Canadian Market.
The Scalar i2000, for example, can detect a suspected fault condition in the library or in the paths between the host and the library, and turn that into an email message to a specific list of individuals or pager networks.