scaling factor

scaling factor

[′skāl·iŋ ‚fak·tər]
(electronics)
The number of input pulses per output pulse of a scaling circuit. Also known as scaling ratio.
(engineering)
Factor used in heat-exchange calculations to allow for the loss in heat conductivity of a material because of the development of surface scale, as inside pipelines and heat-exchanger tubes.
(physics)
A constant of proportionality which appears in a scaling law.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the attempt to determine the aspect of reliability for LLR, Florence Alberge [29] developed a mutual data-driven rule for scaling factor between the extrinsic elements.
Furthermore, the best estimate of scaling factor of the R7x for anthropogenic forcings is 0.92 (CI: 0.08-1.91; 0.86 with CI 0.18-1.63 in the HadGEM3A-based system), as derived via two-signal analyses (Figs.
Therefore, caution should be used in the appropriate choice of scaling factor. The results from this study suggest that a scale factor of [tau] = 3 may be a reasonable starting point for many applications, but clinical validation is needed.
Also, the hardware degradation effect on the EE is analyzed through various values of the scaling factor g (g x [epsilon] {0, 1/4, and 1/2}) and by using the power scaling law as shown in the following equation [11, 12]:
The transformation can be interpreted, approximately, as the effect of a time dilation which is determined by the scaling factor [[chi].sub.p].
"Gain estimation of nonlinear dynamic systems modeled by an FBFN and the maximum output scaling factor of a self-tuning PI fuzzy controller," Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence, 42: 1-5.
In order to scale a process from a laboratory-sized extruder to the manufacturing-scale, a scaling factor is needed to translate operating conditions.
SF is the related scaling factor. In Table 2, the input-output relations are given for the related terms of proposed fuzzy PID controller.
where [alpha] is a system- and geometry-dependent scaling factor and c is the integral constant.
But using a single scaling factor for [mu], [b.sub.i], and [b.sub.u] is not a good idea.
The scaling factor [k.sub.x] plotted in Figure 6(b) shows an example of [f.sub.pw](t).