scanning acoustic microscope


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scanning acoustic microscope

[′skan·iŋ ə¦küs·tik ‚mī·krə‚skōp]
(acoustics)
A type of acoustic microscope in which a collimated beam of acoustic radiation is focused by a spherical cavity filled with coupling fluid and an object is mechanically scanned by moving it through the focus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Depending on the volume of parts and customer needs, the parts may be scanned on a manual or partly automated C-mode scanning acoustic microscope (CSAM), or on a fully automated tray scanner.
The C-SAM, or C-Mode Scanning Acoustic Microscope, is an ultra-high-frequency ultrasonic imaging system that looks inside opaque samples and reveals internal features such as defects and construction details.
Those samples were measured with the scanning acoustic microscope Sonix HS-1000 using a 50 MHz focused lens with an aperture of 12[degrees] (Fig.
By 1973, Quate and colleague Ross Lemons had invented the scanning acoustic microscope. This device used sound waves to show flaws beneath the surface of a silicon chip.
One way to determine hidden structures and defects is to use a scanning acoustic microscope. "An acoustic microscope allows you to see through structures that are not optically transparent," says Anita Rohm, head of product development at Leica Mikroskopie and Systeme GmbH, Wetzlar.
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