scarab

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Related to scarabs: Scarab beetle

scarab

1. any scarabaeid beetle, esp Scarabaeus sacer (sacred scarab), regarded by the ancient Egyptians as divine
2. the scarab as represented on amulets, etc., of ancient Egypt, or in hieroglyphics as a symbol of the solar deity

Scarab

 

a representation of a scarabaeus (a type of beetle) carved from stone. In ancient Egypt scarabs served as talismans, amulets, and ornaments.

scarab

dung-beetle; said to carry secret of eternal life. [Egyptian Legend: Brewer Dictionary, 967]

scarab

symbol for Ra, sun-god; reborn each day. [Animal Symbolism: Mercatante, 180]
References in periodicals archive ?
The club building, designed by architect Lancelot Sukert and completed in 1928, was situated close to the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), as many Scarabs were affiliated with it as well.
Bruce Gill kindly assisted with identification of the scarabs, based on photographs of live specimens.
The following is a list of localities and the scarabs collected there.
It is believed that the ability to both see and reflect CP light probably evolved to allow jewel scarabs to communicate with each other while staying hidden from predators, but Brady and Cummings are planning more research to see exactly how these beetles use this very rare way of seeing and being seen.
Scarabs in this context are amulets in the shape of a dung beetle by the same name.
At the Karnak temple, the moms ferried 10 sheep and goats across the Nile, then Ruiz had to search for a carved scarab in a simulated archaeological dig.
Today, you can still buy scarabs on cuff-links, brooches, pins and rings.
Certainly, those scarabs he identifies as the Omega- and Jasper groups ([sections]54-58) were locally made, amply shown by their engraving techniques and the subject matter of their designs, at least partially drawn from the repertoire of west Asiatic cylinder seals.
Scarabs were crafted from all types of material to commemorate social highlights from weddings to successful hunting trips, their significance in ancient Egypt was profound.
In the first, sections are included for stone vessels, ceramics, scarabs, beads, ostrich eggshells, and statuettes, among other categories, with related Minoan works included in sub-chapters.
Omid, who brings his multi-cultural slant on life to the Comedy Store this weekend, played the sneaky treasure hunter who gets, er, bugged, by blood-sucking scarabs.
Six sites are discussed in detail and placed in their greater context of the era and geographic location; specialist chapter topics include reports on the Roman and Late Roman fine wares, the stamped amphora handles, coins, Late Ottoman pipes, scarabs and scaraboids, and shells.