scarlet letter


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scarlet letter

“A” for “adultery” sewn on Hester Prynne’s dress. [Am. Lit.: The Scarlet Letter]

scarlet letter

the letter “A” for “adultery” sewn on Hester Prynne’s garments. [Am. Lit.: Hawthorne The Scarlet Letter]
See: Stigma
References in periodicals archive ?
Or if, as Kopley maintains, Hawthorne had read the passage in Wheelwright's book sometime between 1842 when it was published and 1849 when he was writing The Scarlet Letter, Hawthorne might have been reminded of that outlook and incorporated it into his book.
Thy mother is yonder woman with the scarlet letter,' said the seaman.
The texts related to intertextuality of both the works, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and John Updike's The Scarlet Letter Trilogy, is the source of research data.
This bureaucratic position finds its literary equivalent in his stated role as "editor, or very little more" of the manuscript he finds accompanying the scarlet letter (Hawthorne 1: 4).
And Hawthorne, when he writes The Scarlet Letter, is trying hard, if not to be one, at least to make a convincing show of it.
Like Hester's embroidery of the scarlet letter which "gives evidence of a now forgotten art, not to be recovered even by the process of picking out the threads" (25), the "elements" of Pearl's character have "an order peculiar to themselves, amidst which the point of variety and arrangement was difficult or impossible to be discovered" (63).
As she writes, The Scarlet Letter is "replete with echoes of gospel narratives: of the woman caught in adultery, of Pharisees' hypocrisy and institutional oppression, of wrestling with demons, of the Sermon on the Mount, of passion and crucifixion" (4).
includes writing prompts aligned to core basal reading texts and high-quality, grade-level appropriate literature such as Henry IV and The Scarlet Letter.
The tragedy of The Scarlet Letter and Madame Bovary, among countless other tales of loose women and cheating wives, addresses universal notions of female sexuality and fidelity.
The twelve essays included here discuss Hawthorne's time in Concord with transcendentalists and utopian idealists, his work as a cultural theorist, his role in defining American masculinity, his involvement in the women's 'emancipation', the author's use of the sketch in his last published work, his view of American history and national identity and then of childhood and four essays discussing The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables, The Blithedale Romance and The Marble Faun.
The 22nd in our collection of 25 great family reads is Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter.
Most readers will recall the infamous red A of Nathaniel Hawthorne's classic novel, but as Steven Heller pointed out, "The Scarlet Letter is not the only scarlet letter" (The Education of an Illustrator).