scattering angle

scattering angle

[′skad·ə·riŋ ‚aŋ·gəl]
(physics)
The angle between the initial and final directions of motion of a scattered particle. Also known as scatter angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
m] is the corrected scattering angle for maximum intensity, which is related to the actual scattering angle, [[theta].
DLS data taken at one scattering angle enable measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of the protein while simultaneously measuring molar mass by MALS.
In order to simulate the resolution at finite scattering angle (or finite scattering variable Q), a single-crystal diffraction sample is used to simulate Bragg peaks.
22] are the elements of the scattering amplitude function matrix for the raindrop with the diameter D, which are the functions of scattering angle [THETA] (cos = [THETA] = [[?
He further added that by measuring the scattering angle and understanding the physics of Coulomb multiple scattering, one can assess the locations and amount of the melted fuel in the reactor.
Figure 4 shows the comparison of EPILE + FBM and MOM for BSC of the composite sense versus the scattering angle.
According to the previous papers [11,22], tapering parameter g and surface length L should satisfy all requirements of the wave equation, correlation length, energy truncation and the largest scattering angle [[theta].
The standard ISO 7027 requires a measuring wavelength of 880 nm (near infrared light), a scattering angle 90deg, and calibration of the instruments with formazine solutions.
Because the muon scattering angle increases with atomic number, core materials within a reactor show up more clearly than the surrounding containment building, plumbing and other objects.
m] is the electron density of the medium in which the particles are dispersed, and q = (4[PI]/[lambada]) sin [theta], with 2[theta] the scattering angle, and [lambada] is the wavelength.
The figure represents the variation in the scattered intensity with the scattering vector, q, which is defined by: q = 4[pi] sin ([theta]/2)/[lambda], where [lambda] is the wavelength of the incident radiation (x-ray, light) and [theta] is the scattering angle.
Detectors measure intensity as a function of scattering angle and derive particle size based on Mie scattering theory.