sceptic


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sceptic

(archaic and US), skeptic
1. a person who habitually doubts the authenticity of accepted beliefs
2. a person who doubts the truth of religion, esp Christianity
References in classic literature ?
We have just been treated to a lecture, a good quarter of an hour long, from Challenger, who was so excited that he roared and bellowed as if he were addressing his old rows of scientific sceptics in the Queen's Hall.
There were, as respects this belief, certainly a few sceptics, but then they enjoyed their doubts in private, with that species of sublimated and solitary gratification that a miser finds in gazing at his growing, but useless, hoards.
On the appointment of Boris Johnson, David Davies and Liam Fox, the environmental organisation expressed potential concern given their voting record and links to climate sceptic funders and think tanks.
Professor Nutt, I believe, is a sceptic on the question of whether hard drugs should be completely banned.
Prof Richard Muller, a physicist and climate change sceptic who founded the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (Best) project, said he was surprised by the findings of the scientific study set up to address climate change sceptics' concerns about whether human-induced global warming is occurring.
Sally Morgan was challenged by the Merseyside Sceptic Society to complete a simple test which they say will prove whether her abilities are genuine.
And the Euro sceptic MPs for Nuneaton (Marcus Jones) and North Warwickshire (Dan Byles) are part of the right wing faction opposing the Prime Minister.
A sceptic, of course, would say that agents accustomed to drumming up interest in their playing clients, now do the same for managers.
Are we as a nation finally breaking free of the sceptic shackles of the Murdoch press, the daily frighteners and the special or disastrous relationship with US wars, which have cost us so dearly in lives and taxes?
The creator of http://www.skepdic.com, Robert Todd Carroll has adapted some of his material from his online sceptic's dictionary into a 400-page plus book.
The series of essays by David Hume--"The Epicurean," "The Stoic," "The Platonist," and "The Sceptic" (1)--is relatively well known but has perhaps received less philosophical attention than it should receive.