red blood cell

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Related to schistocyte: target cell, microspherocyte, burr cell

red blood cell:

see bloodblood,
fluid pumped by the heart that circulates throughout the body via the arteries, veins, and capillaries (see circulatory system; heart). An adult male of average size normally has about 6 quarts (5.6 liters) of blood.
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red blood cell

[′red ′bləd ‚sel]
(histology)
References in periodicals archive ?
So, for instance, a hemoglobin value of 9 g/dl in a 35-year old female with a thrombocyte count of 25 x [10.sup.9]/L in combination with a pre-classification result of 10 percent schistocytes should be presented by the system as a high-priority differential.
The 10 class labels chosen were based on clinical significance and availability: schistocytes, dacrocytes (teardrop cells), acanthocytes, elliptocytes, stomatocytes, spherocytes, codocytes (target cells), echinocytes, overlap, and normal.
TTP was diagnosed in this patient owing to the presence of thrombocytopenia, MAHA with schistocytes of 3% and neurological manifestations.!91 Systemic bacterial and fungal infections were excluded with several negative blood cultures, as severe sepsis is one of the differentials for schistocytosis and thrombocytopenia.
Important distinguishing features that may assist in diagnosing TTP in this context include the presence of schistocytes on peripheral smear, a negative Coombs test, normal complement levels, and a low level of ADAMTS13 activity.
Microangiopathic hemolysis ([greater than or equal to]1% schistocytes plus helmet cells and the presence of any number of spherocytes)
In a prospective design, patients with symptoms suggestive of TMA, along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, were investigated and those confirmed by presence of significant number of schistocytes on the peripheral blood smear were included in the study.
In peripheral smear, widespread schistocytes, polychromasia, spherocytes, as well as high serum levels of indirect bilirubin and LDH were observed in our case.
Haptoglobin was not decreased, and a peripheral smear examination was negative for schistocytes, ruling out hemolytic uremic syndrome.
Indirect bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were increased, serum haptoglobin was decreased, and a peripheral smear showed a few schistocytes and some spherocytes; these findings were most consistent with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.
Our main hypothesis remained a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) despite the absence of schistocytes on repeated blood tests.
The blood smear test showed schistocytes and erythrocyte fragmentation, and ADAMTS13 test was negative.