schnapps

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schnapps

, schnaps
1. a Dutch spirit distilled from potatoes
2. (in Germany) any strong spirit
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References in periodicals archive ?
Admittedly this demands more, but confidence counts for much at a lowly level on the all-weather and Wodhill Schnaps is sure to have a spring in his step after that last demolition.
Wodhill Schnaps must shoulder a 6lb penalty after scoring over course and distance last week, but the manner of his latest romp suggests that will do little to hamper his chances of repeating the trick.
The term "instructional consultation" was coined by Bergan and Schnaps (1983), who likened the model to behavioral consultation, which is targeted at changing teachers' behavior rather than students' behavior.
pounds 20 ROUND: Five pints of Fosters lager and four 'Brain Damage' chasers - a cocktail of Baileys and Archers peach schnaps with grenadine.
And I would love if somebody proves me wrong on this, as I am writing a whole book on Namibia's past and present, with chapters on music--from dagga to schnaps, etc--and I am trying to get more non-white information.
They also argue that the benefits certainly justify the time commitment (see also Cooke, Heward, Test, Spooner, & Courson, 1991; Fuchs & Fuchs, 1986; Lund, Schnaps, & Bijou, 1983)
Suddenly, prodigiously, as the novel's title suggests, Abraham returns to the world of the living, though this time not as a serious scholar who never cracked a smile, but as a grotesque comic character eager to drink schnaps and causing all sorts of disasters, such as upsetting a china cupboard while trying to get a drink of schnaps.
A GIRL of 15 downed glasses of apple schnaps before driving off in the family car.
Sometimes the great statesman would forego the Kik family's famed smorrebrod, instead buying a beer and a schnaps to accompany the packed lunch his mother had prepared for him.
In the eighteenth century, the popular classes in most of northern Germany abandoned beer for distilled spirits (Branotwein), increasingly in the form of cheap potato Schnaps. This north German conversion to spirits (south Germans remained attached to their watery beer) seemed at first to be no more than a new, regional peculiarity created by enterprising Junker estate owners who had discovered another way of drawing profits from their grain and potato harvests and by rural laborers who viewed spirits as a quicker, cheaper, more portable way of getting alcohol into their bodies.
In March 1985, Agence France-Presse reported that "Schnaps" and "Pollux" of Strasbourg were getting married after a Minitel courtship that included exchanges of love poems by computer.