Scholia

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Related to scholium: Scholion, scholiast

Scholia

 

explanatory notes on the margins of classical (mainly Greek) and medieval manuscripts. The term is first encountered in the works of Galen (second century A.D). Unlike commentaries, scholia did not explicate the text as a whole; they dealt with individual passages in Greek and Roman classics, in the Bible, and in works by early Christian writers.

The first scholiast is considered to be the grammarian Didymus Chalcenterus of Alexandria (first century A.D). Ancient scholia are those by such early Greek philologists as Aristarchus of Samothrace and Zenodotus of Ephesus; new scholia date from the later classical and medieval periods. Many medieval scholia are anonymous. The writing of scholia came to an end in the 15th and 16th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
II) Hipotesis resolutiva (temptamentum resolutivum): El problema es solamente aparente, puesto que la recta interpretacion de EOGD, i, xvii, Scholium revela que este escolio no contiene aseveracion categorica equivocista alguna.
III) Demonstrandum: EOGD, i, xvii, Scholium afirma que 'intelecto' y 'voluntad' predicanse con equivocidad cabal del intelecto divino y del intelecto humano, y de la voluntad divina y de la voluntad humana, solamente si es el caso que tanto el intelecto cuanto la voluntad divinos pertenecen a la esencia divina.
Also in this margin, Ximenez included a reference to his scholium at the end of the volume, which in turn uses the Arabic numerals to address the first folio's assertions of Europeanstyle writing.
Newton actually made use of the law of interaction in his scholium above to justify some particular situations where his Third Law of action-reaction does not apply directly.
91: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "makes everybody hope," but literally [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] means "I hope"), where [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "hopes" must mean "makes [everybody] hope" and to which another Iliadic scholium makes reference (1,434b Erbse: here [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "they moved nearer" means [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "they made it approach").
For a statement of Newton's natural philosophy, see his general scholium added to the second edition of the Principia (1713), Sir Isaac Newton's Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy and His System of the World, trans.
Sommerstein, Birds 271-72 ad 1073, puts the expulsion at "no later than about 417"; and the scholium ad 14 which preserves Craterus' remarks (FGrH 342 F16) certainly allows dates of "no later than about 417," or 416, or possibly even 415 for the decree and Diagoras' expulsion.
52) The scholium on Epicurus voluptatis assertor begins with a hint of "the rehabilitation of Epicurus" that Erasmus observed in process in his own day.
But it here seems to me that he cannot truly fulfill his promise of treating the correspondence as principally a debate between Leibniz and Clarke; for, as Vailati himself admits, there are no texts of Clarke's regarding this subject apart from the correspondence, and what Clark says is "virtually identical" to what Newton argues in De gravitatione and in the scholium on space and time from the Principia (p.
In fact, a scholium in the early editions explains the name Philetymus as "amans veritatis," while interpreting "Pseudocheus" (the liar's name) as "fusor mendaciorum," that is, one who "pours forth" lies; the second part of this compound is apparently derived from LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
There is also a scholium on papyrus referring to Il.
with the same introductory formula, is also quoted as a scholium in the margin to the text of Herodotus 1.