Scholia

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Related to scholium: Scholion, scholiast

Scholia

 

explanatory notes on the margins of classical (mainly Greek) and medieval manuscripts. The term is first encountered in the works of Galen (second century A.D). Unlike commentaries, scholia did not explicate the text as a whole; they dealt with individual passages in Greek and Roman classics, in the Bible, and in works by early Christian writers.

The first scholiast is considered to be the grammarian Didymus Chalcenterus of Alexandria (first century A.D). Ancient scholia are those by such early Greek philologists as Aristarchus of Samothrace and Zenodotus of Ephesus; new scholia date from the later classical and medieval periods. Many medieval scholia are anonymous. The writing of scholia came to an end in the 15th and 16th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
The implied characterization of Batavians or Hollanders as blockheads apparently needed an explanation for readers outside the Low Countries, since a scholium has been added, which states that Hollanders are commonly nicknamed "crassi" ("vulgari ioco" 1531, ed.
I have used the 1531 edition of the Colloquia; the scholium appears on pp.
The most explicit of these is in Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, part 1, proposition 7, scholium, where he says, "there is nothing in common between the possible and the impossible, or [sive] between the intelligible and the unintelligible, just as there is nothing in common between something and nothing"; Curley, 249.
Also in this margin, Ximenez included a reference to his scholium at the end of the volume, which in turn uses the Arabic numerals to address the first folio's assertions of Europeanstyle writing.
Newton actually made use of the law of interaction in his scholium above to justify some particular situations where his Third Law of action-reaction does not apply directly.
91: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "makes everybody hope," but literally [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] means "I hope"), where [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "hopes" must mean "makes [everybody] hope" and to which another Iliadic scholium makes reference (1,434b Erbse: here [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "they moved nearer" means [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "they made it approach").
These theories were to be found in several places: the general scholium that Newton had added to the 1713 edition of the Principia Mathematica; queries 17-23, posed in the Latin translation (1706) of the first English edition of the Opticks (1704);(58) and two communications written by Newton in 1675 and 1679, which were published only in 1744 and 1747.
Thus Newton appended a so-called "General Scholium," or gloss to his Principia, in which he stated: "This most beautiful system of the sun, planets, and comets, could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent and powerful Being.
Edwin Curley (New York: Penguin Books, 1996), part I, proposition 33, scholium 1.
See Robert Rynasiewicz, "By Their Properties, Causes and Effects: Newton's Scholium on Time, Space, Place, and Motion--I.
Scholium to the Definitions in Newton, Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, Bk.
The scholium may represent Erasmus' harshest comment on Epicurus, but it is markedly inconsistent with the discussion of Epicureanism in his other writings.