scientific method


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scientific method

[‚sī·ən′tif·ik ′meth·əd]
(science and technology)
The systematic collection and classification of data and, usually, the formulation and testing of hypotheses based on the data.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper attempts to explicate the concept of the "entrepreneurial method" by way of analogy to the scientific method. The present authors didn't originate the link between the entrepreneurial method and scientific method--that was done by Sarasvathy and Venkataraman (2011).
The scientific method is about inquiry, not forcing mathematical conclusions and experimental results to fit with established theory.
Then explain that this guide will examine the scientific method using three student's experiments as examples.
Your goal in this experience is to use the scientific method to determine testable variables of the condoms presented to you.
We are proposing the use of the scientific method to accomplish this goal.
This book strikes a balance between the need to cover the scientific method independent of a specific field (discipline generic) and those aspects of employing scientific research methods that are relevant or potentially unique to geography (geography specific).
Biology4kids.com presents this brief yet fun and informative site about the scientific method. Students can apply what they have learned by taking an online quiz about the scientific method.
But, in order to qualify as 'scientific knowledge,' an inference or assertion must be derived by the scientific method. Proposed testimony must be supported by appropriate validation--i.e., 'good grounds,' based on what is known.
SCI 150 fulfills the objectives of the lab science requirement by using concepts in forensic science to exemplify the scientific method. Important forensics topics covered in class include processing the crime scene, Locard's Exchange Principle1, and class versus individual evidence, to name a few.
The scientific method is one of the most powerful of all the approaches yet devised for obtaining answers to questions.
In response to the cardinal's comments, two Roman Catholic scientists asked Pope Benedict XVI to clarify the matter and reaffirm earlier statements in support of evolution, The New York Times reports, expressing hope that "in these difficult and contentious times the Catholic Church not build a new divide, long ago eradicated, between scientific method and religious belief." Cardinal Theodore McCarrick of Washington told reporters at the National Press Club on July 11 that "as long as in every understanding of evolution the hand of God is recognized as being present, [Catholics] can accept that."

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