buckling

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Related to scleral buckling: retinal detachment, pneumatic retinopexy

buckling

[′bək·liŋ]
(engineering)
Wrinkling or warping of fibers in a composite material.
(mechanics)
Bending of a sheet, plate, or column supporting a compressive load.
(nucleonics)
The size-shape factor that appears in the general nuclear reactor equation and is a measure of the curvature of the neutron density distribution in the reactor.

Buckling

 

in strength of materials, the bending of an originally straight column under the effect of centrally applied axial compressive forces that exceed the column’s bearing power. For a column of uniform cross section exhibiting elastic behavior, the various forms of buckling correspond to critical values of the compressive forces Nc = μ2n2EI/(μl)2, where E is the modulus of elasticity of the material of the column, I is the minimum value of the axial moment of inertia of the column’s cross section, l is the length of the column, μ is the coefficient of reduced length dependent on the conditions of end support of the column, and n is an integer. The minimum value for the critical force is usually of practical interest in that for a column with pinned ends (μ = 1), this force causes bending of the column according to a half-cycle sine curve (n = 1). The magnitude of the force is calculated by the Euler formula Nc = π2EI/l2. The stress σc = Nc/F(F is the cross-sectional area of the column) corresponds to the critical force and is called the critical stress. If the value of the critical stress exceeds the proportional limit of the column material, then buckling occurs in the zone of plastic deformations. In this case, the minimum critical force is determined by the formula Nc = π2n2TI/(μl)2, where T is the modulus, which characterizes the dependence between the deformations and the stresses beyond the limits of the elastic deformations.

In structural design, buckling is taken into account in calculating column loads.

L. V. KASAB’IAN

buckling

The collapse of a slender vertical element which has been subjected to compression, leading to a sudden sideways deflection.

buckling

buckling
Buckling failure of hollow shaft of ductile material.
A state of unstable equilibrium of a thinwalled body when compressive loads are applied on its walls. The resultant deformation may be elastic (i.e., the body regains its shape once compressive loads are removed) or permanent. In some cases, it may even lead to collapse of the structure. The most visible forms of buckling are wrinkles or kinks on the surface of a sheet metal aircraft structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heimann, and SPR Study Group, "Scleral buckling versus primary vitrectomy in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment study (SPR Study): recruitment list evaluation.
During surgery, some oil particles can be trapped in the orbital spaces during injection, particularly when silicon oil tamponade is combined with scleral buckling procedures.
Pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil (SO) was done in 19 (90.47%) eyes and 2 (9.52%)eyes underwent primary scleral buckling surgery.
Visual recovery after scleral buckling for macula-off retinal detachments: an optical coherence tomography study.
In scleral buckling. a piece of silicone is sutured onto the outside wall of the eyeball and left in place permanently to create an indentation, or buckle, that restores contact with the detached retina.
Conclusion: Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair causes ocular changes, with significantly more decrease in corneal endothelial cell density after pars plana vitrectomy, and more increase in anterior chamber depth and axial length after scleral buckling.
Anterior segment ischemia following scleral buckling in hemoglobin SC disease.
Scleral buckling may be technically challenging and require prolonged surgical time but is usually associated with low risk of ocular complications, less expense, and has similar outcome when compared with pars plana vitrectomy [4,5].
document the possibility that Arruga sutures used for scleral buckling may cause intraocular invasion many years later and state that preventative measures should be taken against potential complications of procedures like cataract surgery in these patients.
Surgical methods commonly described to repair uncomplicated RRD are pneumatic retinopexy procedure, scleral buckling, and pars planavitrectomy.
Clinical course of the patients: Vitrectomy was combined with membrane removal in 18 eyes (34.6%), endolaser photocoagulation in 23 eyes (44.2%), scleral buckling in 34 eyes (65.4%), and removal of an intraocular foreign body embedded in the retina in 4 eyes (7.7%).
We excluded cases treated by scleral buckling, vitrectomy combined with scleral buckling, or use of silicone oil tamponade.