Scouse


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Scouse

Brit informal
1. a person who lives in or comes from Liverpool
2. the dialect spoken by such a person
3. of or from Liverpool; Liverpudlian
References in periodicals archive ?
The Scouse brow is still hugely popular in the north with the likes of Coleen Rooney, but southerners have their own interpretation.
TICKETSLittle Scouse on the Prairie runs at the Royal Court until January 21, co.
For those who do not know, Scouse is a stew of lamb or beef and vegetables.
Scouse or lobscouse came to mean any cheap, unthickened meat stew, usually comprising lamb or mutton and always containing potatoes.
In the years ahead they will speak much more Scouse too.
The exhibition includes a collection of striking black-and-white photographs, showing Scouse (real name Ian) and his colleagues from the Royal Arcade, with the edifice of the St Davids 2 development in the background.
I might still have the Scouse accent, but I love the North East too much to go back," he said.
But Scouse expert Mr Fritz Spiegl, who wrote the first of four volumes of his guide to the accent in 1965, said the accent was alive and kicking.
Roger McGough's Global Scouse Day WE BECAME European Capital of Culture in two thousand and eight So let's celebrate ten years by stepping up to the plate And what's on the plate?
The show sees the cast from last year's smash, Scouse Pacific, reunited on stage, but this time the unruly Scousers and Irish priest find themselves in the Wild West.
A pair of Scouse builders claim to have created a shrine to Liverpool FC while they were tiling at Neville's Lancashire home.
RAFA BENITEZ has had no thoughts of defecting back to Real Madrid - because of his Scouse daughter