scram

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scram

an emergency shutdown of a nuclear reactor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

scram

[skram]
(nucleonics)
A sudden shutting down of a nuclear reactor, usually by dropping safety rods, when a predetermined neutron flux or other dangerous condition occurs.
To close down a reactor by bringing about a scram.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

scram

In air-intercept usage, a code meaning, “I am about to open fire. Friendly units keep clear or get clear of the indicated contact, bogey, or area.” The direction of withdrawal may be indicated. The type of fire may be indicated (e.g., scram proximity: “I am about to open fire with proximity-fused ammunition”; scram mushroom: “I am about to fire a special weapon.”)
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the protection system would detect a scram signal when the pressure, the flow rate of the primary loop, or the turbine power reaches specified values.
In this case, the protection system receives three scram signals: too high neutron flux in the relative power level referenced to the rated power ([greater than or equal to] 1.23), too high helium temperature at core outlet ([greater than or equal to] 800[degrees]C), and too large absolute sliding rate of the primary system pressure ([greater than or equal to] 0.031 MPa/min).
After an earthquake, the HTR-10GT protection system will receive two scram signals: too high neutron flux in relative power level referenced to the rated power ([greater than or equal to] 1.23) and too short reactor period ([less than or equal to] 20 s).
The accident detection and protection system of the HTR-10GT is triggered by scram signals.
The four methods examined were: (1) a fixed threshold for all test items; (2) thresholds based on item surface features such as the amount of reading required; (3) thresholds based on visually inspecting response time distributions; (4) thresholds statistically generated based on a two-state mixture model (Schnipke & Scrams, 1997; 2002).