nurse

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nurse

1. a person, usually a woman, who tends the sick, injured, or infirm
2. Zoology a worker in a colony of social insects that takes care of the larvae

What does it mean when you dream about a nurse?

Dreaming of a nurse suggests a need to be taken care of and to be healed. It also sometimes indicates a healing is in progress. This dream also implies that strained or unpleasant conditions are being set aright.

References in periodicals archive ?
"I said I don't have one, doctor," Scrub Nurse repeated in an emphatic tone.
Operating Room Cooling Load Equipment Qty Total Total Heat Gain, Gain, W Btu/hr Anesthesia machine 1 100 341 Medication station 1 104 355 Fluid warmer 1 180 614 Surgical lights 1 300 1024 Workstation 1 100 341 LCD monitor - 1 100 341 large LCD monitor - 2 200 682 small Ambient lights 8 1024 3494 Anesthesiologist 1 103 351 Surgeons 3 85.6 292 Scrub nurse 1 76.6 261 Circulating nurse 1 80.4 274 Patient 1 54.3 185 Total Heat Gain 1 2539 8663
The surgery flowed like a 90-minute choreographed dance, with the scrub nurse handing the surgeon the next instrument before being asked.
The surgery flowed like a 90-minute choreographed dance with the scrub nurse handing the surgeon the next instrument before being asked.
They loved doing splints, dressing for scrub nurse, viewing through a GI scope, care flight and listening to their heart and lungs.
The 20-minute procedure consisted of a scrub nurse who, after completing a three-minute surgical scrub, gowned and gloved and, with an assistant, proceeded to drape the patient with a pre-sterilized bed sheet.
But up until three years ago, she was a scrub nurse helping surgeons with operations.
The ex-love of Darren Day has landed a role in Holby City - as a flirty scrub nurse.
For example, the operating room scrub nurse or technician and the anesthesia technician cannot set up the instruments table or anesthesia machine until the room is cleaned.
She was responsible for counting the instruments in tandem with the scrub nurse, and recording the count in the medical record.
I had one eye on the operation and one eye on the way the people in the theatre inter-acted, from the surgeon to the scrub nurse.''
As he describes it, it was all aseptic and clinical: "She was put under anesthesia in the operating room of a major teaching hospital; I scrubbed my hands, gowned and gloved, chatted briefly with the scrub nurse, sat down on a little metal stool"-and so he describes, in the most matter-of-fact way, how he changed from one instrument to another until the suction was turned on, the procedure was finished, and he examined the shards of tissue to assure himself that nothing had been left behind.