scud running


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scud running

A technique generally regarded as an attempt to maintain visual flight in marginal conditions, such as when a ceiling (or scud) is less than 1000 ft (300 m) and visibility is less than 3 miles (5 km). Either disorientation or failure to see and avoid obstacles or terrain is typically the cause of scud-running accidents.
References in periodicals archive ?
That was confirmed by a pilot who was scud running beneath an overcast, in flat light off the coast of Alaska on a winter day.
A generalized statement to climb (and confess) as an antidote to scud running requires several caveats.
We're told pilots shoot approaches at Allen all the time--there's no prohibition against that--and then break off to other airports, scud running under the clouds.
We've all heard the old pilot joke, "If it's too bad to go IFR, we'll go VFR." To avoid going IFR, many of us have gone scud running. A Federal Aviation Administration publication(1) defines "scud running" as "pushing the capabilities of the pilot and the aircraft to the limits by trying to maintain visual contact with the terrain while trying to avoid physical contact with it."
Pilots attacked his decision to take-off in bad weather and said he was "scud running" - a dangerous manouevre trying to fly below heavy haze.
But here's the bottom line: If this guy, an experienced pilot flying a capable airplane into airspace with which he was familiar, can get killed scud running, how well do you think you'll do when you don't have all that going for you?
Factor into your evaluation the alternative: scud running in a world of towers and potential spatial disorientation as you transition to and from the gauges, looking for the airport.
Scud running has various definitions, but one we like says it's the practice of flying quite low to stay under the clouds.
For our purposes, we included accidents that met this definition, but also scud running, canyon crawling--there's a lot of that, for some reason--and botched takeoffs or approaches that wound up in the trees.
Either way, scud running (February 2009) in a helicopter poses less risk than for fixed-wing brethren.