scumbling


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Related to scumbling: Zeuxis and Parrhasius

scumbling

In painting, the operation of lightly rubbing a brush containing a small quantity of opaque or semiopaque color over a surface to soften and blend tints that are too bright, or to produce a special effect; the coat may be so thin as to be semitransparent.
References in periodicals archive ?
The moody scumbling, planar layers, and primarily vertical format of Pierre Soulages's walnut-stain works on paper, a selection of which were exhibited recently at Haim Chanin Fine Arts, signal a strong affinity with the paintings of Mark Rothko.
27) Elsewhere in the painting, Watts used a simple structure of two to four paint layers, usually placing darker colours over light, often finishing with thin layers of glaze or scumbling.
One of the very few paintings the artist dated, Woman with a Hat (1907), so unlike his earlier portraits, displays a variety of expressive brushstrokes, scumbling, and dripping, while in Head of a Woman (c.
What is noteworthy in these sources that range from Vasari to Bernardo de' Dominici (1732) is how consistently women painters are denied the painterly brush of impasto and scumbling, and how exclusively they are assigned smooth, polished styles.