scuttlebutt


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scuttlebutt

[′skəd·əl‚bət]
(naval architecture)
A cask on shipboard which holds a day's supply of drinking water.
A drinking fountain on shipboard or at a marine installation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, scuttlebutt from the Navy community claims that the rescue succeeded in spite of Obama's indecisiveness and interference, not because of his leadership.
"The scuttlebutt, the best-guessing all week long was that he would go somewhere at the end of the trip," said Steve Thomma of McClatchy, who spoke via cell phone from Istanbul, where most of the White House press corps remained after the president left.
If you keep up with industry news and scuttlebutt, then you've seen plenty of layoffs, project cutbacks and outright liquidations by small biotechs in the past few months.
Scuttlebutt: The cask of drinking water on board a ship, around which the sailors would gather and gossip.
Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich, the scuttlebutt has it, has already had crew go through "a thorough grounding" in skills that range from fighting shipboard fires to "folding napkins."
This may all just be idle scuttlebutt, but just where is Wendy these days?
Of course by that time, the '10s will be here and they will no doubt bring with them more scuttlebutt and problems, dP
Scuttlebutt is that the coal industry, historically an alternative fuel for power generation when natural gas prices climb or supplies are limited, could very well be hit with more stringent pollution regulations.
It was not a runaway success, and over the years there has been more than a little scuttlebutt about its continued existence.
The scuttlebutt among besieged shippers may be that railroads hold all the power of a monopoly, but price trends data from the U.S.
AS SOON as we're Princess Diana-ed out, along comes the relief cavalry, the Princess Margaret brigade with their ageing tittle-tattle and scuttlebutt. But there was one intriguing snippet in extracts from Tim Heald's "new" book on the first postwar Royal glamour puss.