scythe

(redirected from scythes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

scythe

a manual implement for cutting grass, etc., having a long handle held with both hands and a curved sharpened blade that moves in a plane parallel to the ground

scythe

[th]
(design engineering)
A tool with a long curved blade attached at a more or less right angle to a long handle with grips for both hands; used for cutting grass as well as grain and other crops.

scythe

carried by the personification of death, used to cut life short. [Art.: Hall, 276]
See: Death
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to the length of the scythes, users must be between 5ft and 6ft 4 in height.
Only those individuals who are "gleaned"--legally assassinated--by scythes are permanently dead; others can be revived.
In this riveting sequel to Printz Honor Book Scythe: Arc of a Scythe, Book 1 (Simon & Schuster 2017/VOYA February 2017) the titular Thunderhead, a sentient cloud that rules all of humanity, except the Scythes, is front and center, providing the chapter introductions and becoming more and more concerned at certain trends developing in the Scythedom.
Besides being an ideal tool for harvesting grass on a small scale, scythes can also be used to harvest small grains, such as wheat and rye.
THESE pictures will provoke scythes of relief from millions of Poldark fans.
The founding crops of agriculture -- emmer and einkorn wheat, barley, lentils, peas, and flax -- were first farmed ten thousand or so years ago, which led to innovations like forged plows and scythes during the Iron Age, grafting expertise eventually followed, and then, most importantly, garden gnomes appeared in Britain in the 1840s.
Contract award: delivery of building materials "eso" ead - lot ?1: delivery of equipment (rollers, brushes, building cars, spatulas, trowels, ladders, axes, scythes, shovels, villas, etc.).
Isaac Nash put Belbroughton scythes on the international stage, supplying blades across the Commonwealth, as well as to the United States, South America and parts of Europe.
During a Sunday lesson, hosted by a nonprofit organization called Sustainable Cottage Grove, Leppold taught participants how to care for, repair and sharpen scythes' carbon and steel blades.
Sarah said: "It's important to use traditional methods like scythes rather than expensive mowers and strimmers.
The earliest scythes lacked nibs--the mower simply grasped the snath and swung the blade in an arc.
I enjoyed the article on scythes by Delbert Trew in the July 2008 issue of Farm Collector very much.