sea arch

sea arch

[′sē ‚ärch]
(geology)
An opening through a headland, formed by wave erosion or solution (as by the enlargement of a sea cave, or by the meeting of two sea caves from opposite sides), which leaves a bridge of rock over the water. Also known as marine arch; marine bridge; sea bridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was a mine of information, taking me on a half-day tour which started at Devil's Bridge, a sea arch with pounding surf on the Atlantic coast, and then to Nelson's Dockyard - named of course after the Royal Navy hero who was once stationed here - which is a fine place to while away an afternoon looking round the museum, having a browse in the indoor market and a coffee or a drink in the boutique hotel.
Along the way are the Lua Manu and Pauahi Craters, Mauna Ulu lava shield, Kealakomo Overlook, Pu'u Loa Petroglyphs and Holei Sea Arch.
Three squadrons patrol the ports rotating every eight hours or so in 34-foot Sea Arch aluminum boats.
Tempted by the pillars and the desire to escape his studies, James slips through the Sea Arch and finds himself in the world of Eldaterra.
Farther on, Merritt deftly maneuvered the boat beneath a sea arch and into a dark cave, always backing in.
The horseshoe-shaped cove and nearby Durdle Door, a natural limestone sea arch, are a geologist's paradise with its folded rock formations and dramatic chalk cliffs.
Descending 3,700 feet to the coast, this road passes the Holei Sea Arch, where motorists can see the results of a massive lava flow.
He was a mine of information, taking me on a half-day tour which started at Devil's Bridge, a sea arch On the with pounding surf on the Atlantic coast, and then to Nelson's Dockyard - named of course after the Royal Navy hero who was once stationed here - which is a fine place to while away an afternoon looking round the museum, having a browse in the indoor market and a coffee or a drink in the boutique hotel.