sea mile


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

sea mile

[′sē ′mīl]
(navigation)
An approximate mean value of the nautical mile equal to 6080 feet (1853.184 meters) or the length of a minute of arc along the meridian at latitude 48°.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For the 104-day Saga Commonwealth World Cruise - celebrating the 60th anniversary of the British Commonwealth, no less - the Saga Rose covers 34,499 sea miles and makes 39 ports of call including five Caribbean islands, Costa Rica, Easter Island, Peru, Auckland, Sydney, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, India and both of the world's great ocean canals - the Panama and the Suez.
Experts estimate that the project would reduce the oil route by 1,820 sea miles (2,912 km) compared with the Malacca route.
The X-Craft has a range of 4000 sea miles at 20 knots.
The bosun, Rodolfo, is horrified to find himself ordered to prepare the primitive float knowing full well that the probability of its finding a welcoming shore in the churning sea miles from land is certainly dim.
One of the Boeing 777-200 aircraft's engines is said to have failed about 350 sea miles off the Icelandic coast.
The first stage dropped away to plunge into the sea miles below.
But worse was to follow as they were left adrift at sea miles from the nearest village port.
These sea miles, however, are already very well represented in current Civil War naval historiography.
A large number of people left Duress for Molfetta and Barletta (about 115 sea miles) and Brindisi (75 sea miles).
It hit the sea miles away from me but the concussion was terrific.
He went on: "It hit the sea miles away from me, but the concussion was terrific.
Perhaps it would be possible to cover the sea miles in a day (Columbus's ships averaged about 4 knots) and the distance on land in four more granted entirely friendly circumstances.(2) No doubt the other long delays in the play partly capture the distance and the difficulty of getting from the isolated court of Sjaelland to the rest of the world in Shakespeare's day.