sea mile

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sea mile

[′sē ′mīl]
(navigation)
An approximate mean value of the nautical mile equal to 6080 feet (1853.184 meters) or the length of a minute of arc along the meridian at latitude 48°.
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A large number of people left Duress for Molfetta and Barletta (about 115 sea miles) and Brindisi (75 sea miles).
It hit the sea miles away from me but the concussion was terrific.
He went on: "It hit the sea miles away from me, but the concussion was terrific.
Perhaps it would be possible to cover the sea miles in a day (Columbus's ships averaged about 4 knots) and the distance on land in four more granted entirely friendly circumstances.(2) No doubt the other long delays in the play partly capture the distance and the difficulty of getting from the isolated court of Sjaelland to the rest of the world in Shakespeare's day.
UK entry, Samskara, has done a few sea miles, including the 2010 Melbourne Vanuatu race with her former owner.
The 11-member crew of Sea Lord, a Panama-registered cargo vessel currently anchored three nautical sea miles off the Khalifa Bin Salman port, has not been on land since March.
Two Turkish F-16 planes headed to Turkish-Syrian border for interception, and the Syrian plane moved away only five sea miles to Turkish border, said the statement.
There is evidence, however, that we are engaging in off-shore energy even if the raw material lies under the sea miles to the north of us.
Standing In a time warp We travelled thousands of sea miles on our 28-day cruise to soak up the quest for knowledge.
The toxin - which was discovered in routine tests at the Rhos on Sea beds, many sea miles from the main Conwy Estuary beds - can cause stomach ache and diarrhoea in humans, though the mussels themselves are unharmed by the algae responsible.
Hoping to calm her he hopped aboard another liner (did they have sea miles?) pausing only to go a few rounds with American dancer Libby Holman.
In the 1980s she fell into disrepair after travelling more than 69,000 sea miles and looked likely to rot in the Welsh harbour of Conway.