sea slug


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

sea slug,

name for a marine gastropodgastropod,
member of the class Gastropoda, the largest and most successful class of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), containing over 35,000 living species and 15,000 fossil forms.
..... Click the link for more information.
 mollusk that lacks a shell as an adult and is usually brightly colored. Sea slugs, or nudibranchs, are distributed throughout the world, with the greatest numbers and the largest kinds found in tropical waters. They creep along the bottom or cling to submerged vegetation, usually in water just below the low tide line. Members of a few species swim on the surface in open ocean. Most sea slugs are under 1 in. (2.5 cm) long, although the largest, found in the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, reaches 12 in. (30 cm). Regarded by many people as the most beautiful of marine animals, sea slugs display a great array of solid colors and patterns. Many have feathery structures (ceratia) on the back, often in a contrasting color. Most sea slugs have two pairs of tentacles on the head, used for tactile and chemosensory reception, with a small eye at the base of each tentacle. Sea slugs graze on small sessile animals such as coelenterates, sponges, and bryozoans. Certain sea slugs that feed on corals and sea anemones ingest the stinging cells of their prey without discharging them; these then pass from the slug's digestive tract to the ceratia, where they are used by the slug for its own defense. Sea slugs are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Gastropoda, subclass Opisthobranchia, order Nudibranchiata.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

sea slug

[′sē ‚sləg]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for the naked gastropods composing the suborder Nudibranchia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A morphological and molecular comparison between Elysia crispata and a new species of kleptoplastic sacoglossan sea slug (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia) from the Florida Keys.
[United States], May 3 ( ANI ): Sea slugs, majorly known as the leaves that crawl, can create perpetual green energy.
Significant locality records of nudibranchs and other sea slugs in California and Oregon in 2014-15 are listed systematically by species and documented below.
Surprisingly, now he's learned that the sea slugs aren't simply stealing what they need to do this from the algae.
Cohn was attracted to this study by the extensive data available on miners' strikes and the mining industry in France and by the particular history of miners' unions in that nation: for Cohn French coal miners' strikes are "like a sea slug that receives attention from biologists for its unusually visible liver cells." (6) First, there were 20 comparable individually-documented coal-producing departments.
In that short little war, some outdated Argentine planes went up against American Sidewinder missiles on British Harrier fighters and a whole array of surface-to-air missiles: Sea Slug, Sea Cat, Sea Dart, Sea Wolf, Rapier, even the shoulder-fired British Blowpipe and American Stinger.
Opportunistic male strategies have also been observed in sea slug species that are more closely related to Aplysia californica, the model used in this study (Michiels et al., 2003; Anthes et al, 2006a).
Its marine and coastal environment hosts 272 species-158 species of gastropods (snails and slugs), 15 bivalves (clams, mussels and oysters), 12 crustaceans, 13 echinoderms (starfish, sea cucumber and sea urchins), a sea slug, 26 corals, five turtles and 42 species of fish.
Sea slug specimens were photographed in situ and were identified by Rudman (Australian Museum) (pers.
Joris Koene of the Free University in Amsterdam studied four other sea slug species and found that one always stabbed near the genital opening, while the others stabbed at random, but none went for the head.
However, the male organ was not found among humans but on a sea slug which is found in the Pacific Ocean.
He found that in the sea slug Aplysia californica, which has long been favored by neuroscientists for memory experiments because of its large, easily-studied neurons, a synapse-maintenance protein known as CPEB (Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding protein) has an unexpected property.