sea supremacy

sea supremacy

[′sē sə‚prem·ə·sē]
(ordnance)
That degree of sea superiority wherein the opposing force is incapable of effective interference.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The British Empire could not in future wars afford to trust its security to an untested international organization (Wilson's League) or surrender the bulwark of sea supremacy, which had never failed it.
The application of naval power against the land requires of course an entirely different sort of Navy from that which existed during the struggles for sea supremacy. The basic weapons of the new Navy are those which make it possible to project naval power far inland.
Ultimately, these advances will help the Navy to maintain sea supremacy in the fast-paced war-fighting environment of today.
That theme was predicated on the 1907 remark of a British permanent undersecretary at the Foreign Office that if Britain lost its sea supremacy it would lose its empire, which seems obvious enough nowadays but at the time it was stated was addressing a life and death matter.
It was an age of Portuguese sea supremacy and trade prosperity.
The 1986 Maritime Strategy was essentially a Cold War era strategy with "war as the nucleus," mainly for establishing sea supremacy. The objective was global confrontation with the Soviet Navy.