sea-control operations

sea-control operations

[′sē kən‚trōl ‚äp·ə‚rā·shənz]
(ordnance)
The employment of naval forces, supported by land and air forces, as appropriate, to achieve military objectives in vital sea areas; such operations include destruction of enemy naval forces, suppression of enemy sea commerce, protection of vital sea lanes, and establishment of local military superiority in areas of naval operations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The exercise practiced offensive and sea-control operations well north of the Greenland-Iceland-United Kingdom gap.
Navy doctrinal publication, Naval Warfare, characterizes sea control as one of the service's core capabilities and states that it "requires control of the surface, subsurface, and airspace and relies upon naval forces' maintaining superior capabilities and capacities in all sea-control operations. It is established through naval, joint, or combined operations designed to secure the use of ocean and littoral areas by one's own forces and to prevent their use by the enemy." (9) British Maritime Doctrine has a similar description of sea control: "Sea control is the condition in which one has freedom of action to use the sea for one's own purposes in specified areas and for specified periods of time and, where necessary, to deny or limit its use to the enemy....