seamless robe

seamless robe

Christ’s garment, wagered for by Roman soldiers. [N.T.: John 19:23–24]
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On the left, St John cries out as he looks up towards Christ on the Cross, while to the right soldiers converse as they dice for Christ's seamless robe. Similarly, a print of the Flagellation, based on Mantegna's design, foregrounds Roman soldiers talking together with no regard for the torture of the innocent victim enacted at a little distance behind them.
The final scene shows the soldiers casting lots to secure Jesus'seamless robe (John 19.
In keeping with customs he said he would then "shave his head" and trade the white seamless robe he wore for the Hajj for his "normal clothes."
It contains small precious fragments from the Instruments of the Passion of Our Lord: from the True Cross, Nail, Thorn, Column of Flagellation, Reed, Purple Cloak, Seamless Robe. It also includes the precious first (bone) and second (clothes) class relics of 56 other saints including the 12 Apostles, 10 Doctors of the Church, 10 Founders of Religious Congregations and many more,' Radyo Veritas said.
By reading Mannermaa in this fashion, the reader will be rewarded not simply with a deeper grasp of Luther's "theology of the cross" but a greater sense of what it means to live a "theological existence." "Theology" and "theological existence" for Luther (and for us!) is a "seamless robe" bound together by the loving extra nos and indwelling presence of the Son of God.
St John the Evangelist pauses to gaze at his Master as he hastens to protect His mother from the rough soldiery who dice around his ankles for the seamless robe.
In the Latin West, the orator Tertullian acclaimed the martyrs, while the bishop and martyr Cyprian celebrated the church's unity as the "seamless robe of Christ."
Keith Jeffrey"s eloquent and persuasive book Ireland and the Great War (2001), advanced the belief that the war was the single most central experience in twentieth-century Ireland, and that the events of the war years, whether in Dublin during the Easter Rising or at the European battle front, constituted a "seamless robe" of Irish experience.
"I was born in 1943," he writes, "the year before the jurist Raphael Lemkin coined the word 'genocide."' Carroll's wandering as a teenage Army brat happened to take him to Trier; and that's enough to link him to: Constantine, for whom the city was an important power base; Crusader violence against the Jews (1096); Karl Marx, who was born in Trier in 1818; and Hitler, since the showing of the Seamless Robe of Christ in 1933 was part of a celebration of the concordat between the Vatican and the Nazi regime.
The Seamless Robe or Holy Tunic, believed to have been worn by Jesus on his way to Calvary, drew four million visitors when it was put on display two years ago in the cathedral at Trier, Germany's oldest city.
Four million pilgrims visited the Seamless Robe, said to have been worn by Jesus on his way to the cross when it was put on display in a sealed glass case in Trier cathedral, Germany.
Others may think that the often fractured nature of real theological engagement is too comfortably wrapped in a seamless robe of basically conservative dogmatics.