seaworthiness


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seaworthiness

[′sē·wər·thē·nəs]
(naval architecture)
The fitness of a ship to sail on the sea and meet any usual condition, or to sail on a specific voyage.
References in periodicals archive ?
(26) Where the death of a seaman occurred in territorial waters and was proximately caused by the breach of the warranty of seaworthiness, maritime law provided no right or remedy.
In this respect, we can speak of legal seaworthiness and of contractual seaworthiness.
It also conducts random inspection on foreign ships calling at Namibian ports for verification of seaworthiness, in accordance with international practice on the port state control.
The trial will prove the restored vessel's seaworthiness ahead of any further attempts on the lake.
During the last year, the RST conducted four Redeployment Conferences and supported 30 BCTs, which equates to training 863 unit movement officers, creating more than 1,300 plans in TC-AIMS, generating 57,204 MSLs and 16,489 RFID Tags, and inspecting 8,805 containers for seaworthiness.
I've got a V-bottom jonboat that I dearly love for its simplicity, stability, and seaworthiness. It's a great utility skiff that I use when fishing salmon in saltwater, walleyes in the Columbia River, and bass in inland lakes.
After changing the generator oil, servicing an engine cooler and shadowing a seaworthiness inspection of the ferry, Snowdrop, from bridge to bilges with Marine and Coastguard engineers, Mr Scales said: "It was a fantastic experience, I haven't enjoyed myself so much for years."
"This means it can be used as an additional check on seaworthiness or highlight potential future problems."
The Hull and Monaghan had recently been through a period of refit where a substantial portion of their veteran crews departed and the ships were outfitted with equipment that compromised their already limited seaworthiness. They had also received new, rather young commanding officers (the first from the Naval Academy class of 1938).
Covering everything and every detail a sailor would need to know, including topics such as seaworthiness, dealing with foul weather, provisions, and so much more.
The both oil tankers were said to be owned by one company which as per records / sire inspection of vessel was black listed in USA with poor track record of seaworthiness.
The worst offenders are Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, and Equatorial Africa, which "don't check on whether the planes they license actually fly." Airline operators are imitating the ship owners who registered their leaky dilapidated vessels in Liberia and Panama to avoid the slightest scrutiny of their seaworthiness.