seclusion

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seclusion

[si′klü·zhən]
(meteorology)
A special case of the process of occlusion, where the point at which the cold front first overtakes the warm front (or quasi-stationary front) is at some distance from the apex of the wave cyclone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The student has been diagnosed with multiple developmental disorders, and repeat visits to the school's seclusion room caused her to become claustrophobic, fearful of the dark and suffer nightmares, the suit asserts.
The suit asserts that the girl had been sent to the seclusion room more than once before the day on which her court- appointed advocate arrived at the elementary school on North 51st Street.
The number of seclusions per month is summarised in Table 1.
Already you can find at least 22 of Above Seclusions songs, including one album, for sale on iTunes.
The use of restraint and seclusion procedures to manage significant behavioral issues has moved with these students into the school setting (Ryan & Peterson, 2004).
For example, people often ask about the duration of restraint and seclusions (when they do happen), and whether seclusions are being substituted for restraints--thus taking a benefit by using what some would see as a more coercive technique.
Having reviewed and rated the options in terms of appearance, life span, structural integrity and cost, the Metro District Board determined that Trex Seclusions was the best product for the community's needs, based on the project's application and allocated budget.
The number of misbehaving students placed in small, isolated rooms - known as seclusion rooms - in the Eugene School District dramatically decreased during the last school year, but the district put students in seclusion three times as often as the Springfield School District.
Her medical center has gone from six or seven seclusions a day to one a month because they believe seclusion is traumatizing to children, she said.
Until now, laws regarding restraint and seclusion have differed by state.
This has resulted in a move away from providing direct treatment of behavior dysfunction and an increase in the use of high dosages of psychoactive medications, leading in many cases to unnecessary chemical restraints, mechanical restraints, and seclusion (see Hunter, 1995; Hunter, 1999; Hunter, 2000).
The Springfield School District placed 11 students in seclusion 13 times last year.