second chamber


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second chamber

Politics the upper house of a bicameral legislative assembly
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Lord Wigley warned that if the second chamber's ability to intervene on secondary legislation is restricted it is only a "short step" before its powers over primary legislation are weakened.
| Would cut the membership -and costs - of the second chamber. No more idiotic robes, coronets and ermine.
Holyrood's 129 MSPs don't need a second chamber to revise laws - they do that themselves in crossparty committees.
The Coalition''s proposals would have resulted in a second chamber being filled largely by third rank politicians.
It wants 80% of peers to be elected and the second chamber's membership to be nearly halved from 826 to 450, although dozens of Tory MPs are said to be ready to rebel.
This envisages the Second Chamber continuing its legislative role, holding the Government to account and reviewing the effectiveness of current programmes and developing new policy through the work of specialist committees.
Would they want a second chamber in which they might have a majority to have no power?
Peerages would continue as an honour but would be unconnected with the second chamber. And the number of places given to Church of England bishops and archbishops will stay at 26.
South Staffordshire Tory MP Sir Patrick Cormack, convenor of the Campaign for an Effective Second Chamber, said: "It would be folly to abolish the present House of Lords and replace it with an elected or hybrid second chamber."
In contrast, a majority of peers opted for a wholly appointed second chamber.
Beyond the back door of the second chamber lay dozens of rooms along three corridors arrayed in a T shape.