second law of thermodynamics


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second law of thermodynamics

[′sek·ənd ′lȯ əv ‚thər·mə·dī′nam·iks]
(thermodynamics)
A general statement of the idea that there is a preferred direction for any process; there are many equivalent statements of the law, the best known being those of Clausius and of Kelvin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abdalla, "The generalized second law of thermodynamics in the accelerating universe," Physics Letters B, vol.
However, according to a colleague who has done extensive work on the issue--none of the major climate models explicitly incorporate the second law of thermodynamics. Instead, the models only are constructed to satisfy the basic laws of physics that call for the conservation of energy, mass, and momentum.
Caption: The second law of thermodynamics is showing early signs that it may hold up in the ultrasmall world of quantum mechanics.
However, exergy method evaluates panels based on the second law of thermodynamics. In exergy method, environment temperature is the reference temperature in calculating the theoretical maximum work done by the system in order to reach equilibrium with the reference environment [34].
It's as interesting as watching ice melt, which happens to be a common example of entropy, a key property of the second law of thermodynamics. Go figure.
The Second Law of Thermodynamics requires that a power plant must reject heat, no matter how efficient.
The tendency toward disorder is the basis of the second law of thermodynamics. One biology textbook presents this important question: "Humans, indeed all living things, are highly ordered combinations of organic substances.
Unconstrained by the closed doors of competitive selection, that prevents diffusion, life after a mass extinction can explore morphological space, within the confines of function, driven by the second law of thermodynamics, as all diffusive processes are.
Micozzi (Park Street Press, 2009), I made the following erroneous statement when describing the second law of thermodynamics: "...
Maxwell as a counter-example of the second law of thermodynamics, that is, a perpetuum mobile of the second kind.
The Second Law of Thermodynamics tells us that everything in the universe is slowly collapsing into disorder.

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