molar

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molar

1
1. any of the 12 broad-faced grinding teeth in man
2. a corresponding tooth in other mammals

molar

2
1. (of a physical quantity) per unit amount of substance
2. (not recommended in technical usage) (of a solution) containing one mole of solute per litre of solution
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

molar

[′mō·lər]
(anatomy)
A tooth adapted for grinding.
Any of the three pairs of cheek teeth behind the premolars on each side of the jaws in humans.
(physical chemistry)
Denoting a physical quantity divided by the amount of substance expressed in moles.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is reported that there are different number of cusps and their degree of expression differs in dentition of different ethnic groups.3-5 It has been reported that in mandibular molars the buccal accessory cusps are very rare and existence of an oblique ridge even more rare in mandibular molars.6,7 Another study done on Australian natives has reported that maxillary first molar which forms early showed less variations than the cusps of maxillary second molar.8
The aim of this radiographical study was designed to determine the prevalence of decay on the second molar as an effect of an impacted mandibular third molar in three different age groups.
The mean root thickness of the MB and ML canals in the mandibular first and second molars beyond the 1 mm level was <1 mm.
Pfeil [3] et al in their study proved that anaesthetic success for the 1.8 mL volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was 97% for the second molar and 77% for the first molar.
In this study, mandibular second molars (90.4%) were the most commonly involved teeth followed by maxillary second molars and maxillary first molar with a low prevalence (7.2% and 2.4%, respectively) (Table 1).
The heads of the miniplates were adjusted to the position between the first and second molars (Figure 4).
The pathway of the MC was reflected in the present study in closer distances from MC to dental apices from second molars, concurring with some studies (Koivisto et al., 2011; Burklein et al., 2015), and observing increasing values until the ascending pathway at the second premolars region, at the emergence of mental foramen.
A case of complex odontoma associated with an impacted lower deciduous second molar and analysis of the 107 odontomas.
The mandibular and maxillary second molars had very similar replacement rates to each other (16.7% and 16.4%) and came in at the 3rd and 4th most replaced locations, respectively.
Incidence and configuration of canal systems in the mesiobuccal root of maxillary first and second molars. J Endod.