secondary flow

secondary flow

[′sek·ən‚der·ē ′flō]
(fluid mechanics)
A field of fluid motion which can be considered as superposed on a primary field of motion through the action of friction usually in the vicinity of solid boundaries. Also known as frictional secondary flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
When flow enters the curved position the heavier density phase, i.e., liquid, is subjected to a large centrifugal force that acts right angles to main flow and results in secondary flow, which causes liquid to move away from the centre of curvature while the gas flows toward the centre of the curvature.
To measure energy use and economic benefits of variable primary flow chilled water systems, ARTI conducted an extensive study that compared these systems' energy use with that of other common system types, including: constant flow/ primary only chilled water systems; constant primary flow/variable secondary flow chilled water systems; and primary/secondary chilled water systems with a check valve installed in the decoupler.
Owned by the Department of Metropolitan Services of King County, the plant has an average design flow of 143 mgd and a peak secondary flow of 300 mgd.
A number of oceanographers have argued that the energy associated with this secondary flow is insufficient to move the quantities of sediment needed to create oceanic sand ridges.
When the runner rotates at high speeds, a secondary flow is likely to form in the runner area.
Figure 5 represents the variation of the primary and secondary flow velocities with [OMEGA] rotation of the fluid/plate boundary.
As an integral part of piping systems, elbows are known to be responsible for dramatic change in flow field, high pressure loss, and secondary flow, which are vulnerable in erosive environments.
One of the most important parameters which effect the strength of secondary flow and therefore sediment entry is the vane angle relative to the flow direction.
Results of this work show secondary flow patterns have been successfully reproduced in 3D using both single and multimode constitutive equations.
OIL giant Shell said it is working to stop a secondary flow of oil spilling into the North Sea from beneath an offshore platform.