secondary mineral

secondary mineral

[′sek·ən‚der·ē ′min·rəl]
(mineralogy)
A mineral produced in an enclosing rock after the rock was formed as a result of weathering or metamorphic or solution activity, and usually at the expense of a primary material that came into existence earlier.
References in periodicals archive ?
As secondary mineral, it is found and at places enriched in the the foreland sedimentary fold and thrust belt (Indus Basin) and also in clastic sandstone of different ages because of porous and permeable nature.
Shattuckite is a hydrous copper silicate, [Cu.sub.5][(Si[O.sub.3]).sub.4] [(OH).sub.2], which occurs as a secondary mineral in oxidized copper deposits and is commonly associated with chrysocolla, ajoite, malachite and quartz (Anthony et al., 1995).
In many phenocrysts, secondary mineral associations of Fe-Ti oxides, clinopyroxenes and plagioclases form completely decomposed (pseudomorphed) grains with shape of original minerals.
Another key mineral, ettringite, is a common secondary mineral phase that is formed during the hydration of semicoke and ash in alkaline conditions as a result of the reaction of portlandite with sulphur compounds (oldhamite (CaS) in semicoke and anhydrite (CaS[O.sub.4]) in ash) and dehydroxylated aluminosilicate clays and/or Al-Si glasses.
It is possible that an increase in metastable and stable secondary mineral forms of Al may be associated with more Al in soil porewater.
Further hydrolysis of water alters the albite to a secondary mineral, kaolinite, and releases the sodium and some soluble silica.
This niche for long-distance hauling in the mining industry began to surface as more and more mining companies look to secondary mineral deposits as a way to supplement the declining primary mineral bodies.
Northern Ontario mining outfits can share their expertise in high-end technology and health and safety, but may still have a thing or two to learn about secondary mineral industries.
98-1368, the court reviewed EPA regulations classifying certain secondary mineral processing materials as solid wastes depending upon how and for what period of time they were stored prior to being reused in an ongoing production process.
Alekseyev VA, Medvedeva LS, Prisyagina NI, Meshalkin SS, Balabin Al (1997) Change in the dissolution rates of alkali feldspars as a result of secondary mineral precipitation and approach to equilibrium.
However, talc is present in submarine hydrothermal systems within active chimneys and massive sulfide mounds, where it was observed as secondary mineral precipitates [50, 100, 101].

Full browser ?