secondary succession


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secondary succession

[¦sek·ən‚der·ē sək′sesh·ən]
(ecology)
Ecological succession that occurs in habitats where the previous community has been destroyed or severely disturbed, such as following forest fire, abandonment of agricultural fields, or epidemic disease or pest attack.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chidumayo (2002) reported significant effects of land tenure on rate of biomass accumulation in re-growth during secondary succession following clearing of mature miombo woodland.
Oligodominance, which is very common in the earlier stages of secondary succession, can explain the major contributions of C.
This is a study of density and composition of species found in the seed bank of a secondary forest on pasture abandoned for 10 years, to observe (1) changes in density, richness, diversity, and composition of species during secondary succession of abandoned pastures, and (2) implications of such changes for the forest recovery process.
Hanel L (2003) Recovery of soil nematode populations from cropping stress by natural secondary succession to meadow land.
nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and methane under secondary succession of
While secondary succession has always been an integral process in tropical forest ecosystems following natural disturbances (e.
A sound understanding of primary succession may be important for promoting recovery of degraded ecosystems (Cairns 1980), which can be more similar to primary than to secondary succession (Tilman 1988), and for predicting patterns of forest migration during periods of future climate change (Davis 1989).
Two of the five communities, representing "early secondary succession," are meadows.