secular

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secular

1. of an education, etc.
a. having no particular religious affinities
b. not including compulsory religious studies or services
2. (of clerics) not bound by religious vows to a monastic or other order
3. Astronomy occurring slowly over a long period of time
4. a member of the secular clergy

secular

(sek -yŭ-ler) Continuing or changing over a long period of time.

secular

[′sek·yə·lər]
(engineering)
Of or pertaining to a long indefinite period of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
"If you say you are a Muslim, Christian etc., I feel proud that you have connection with your religion and caste, but who are these so called seculars? Seculars don't have any parentage," Hegde said earlier in his address.
Summary: Koppal (Karnataka) [India], Dec 26 (ANI): Union minister Ananth Kumar Hegde has hinted that Constitution which contained the word "secular" would be amended.
Sixty percent of religious and ultra-orthodox respondents said the sight of a person wearing a cross disturbed them, whilst 91 percent of seculars said they did not mind it.
On almost all issues seculars exhibited an open-minded approach towards Christianity, whereas religious respondents were less than tolerant.
First of all, we must clearly distinguish Turkey as a state and Turkey as a society because the secular character of a given state is not always parallel to the secular character of its inhabitants.
Because of this semantic chaos, politically speaking, we no longer use the term "secular" for a country.
The landscape which Biale's profound text looks at is the origin of Jewish secular thought, its developments, varieties, and outlook.
Judaism presents a diversity of alternatives: ultra orthodoxy, orthodoxy, reform, conservative, liberal and, of course, secular. Each of these types hides an impressive variability.
In Washington, D.C., from April 11 to 13, the Council for Secular Humanism will host a national conference entitled "One Nation Without God?
November 2, 2002, saw history's largest gathering of politically active secular humanists in the United States' capital city.