sediment trap


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sediment trap

[′sed·ə·mənt ‚trap]
(engineering)
A device for measuring the accumulation rate of sediment on the floor of a body of water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sediment trap

sediment trap, 2
1. A removable device inside the body of a drain; used to trap and retain small solids that pass through the grate. The unwanted solids that have accumulated are disposed of.
2. In a gas supply system, a trap useful in collecting dirt or other foreign material that may be entrained in the gas flow, thus protecting the equipment operating controls.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vortsjarv, and as the sediment trap experiments have shown, the major part (up to 96%) of the downward particle flux (including PhPs) is formed of resuspended material (Noges et al.
5: Suspended-sediment concentrations (g/L) in irrigation tailwater at the sediment trap inlet and outlet.
Their topics include photosynthetic pigment concentrations in marine sediments, total protein flux from sediment trap samples, abundance of metazoan meiofauna, benthic bacterial diversity based on cloning and sequencing 16S rRNA genes, and organic carbon remineralization rates in marine surface sediments.
It was also good to see some attention paid to sediment control, as a sediment trap was used to minimize impacts during the construction process and keep sediment from leaving the site.
Comparison of organic quality in seston and sediment traps. Sediment Trap Contents Seston Pigments POM Pigments POM ([micro]g [g.sup.-1]) (%) ([micro]g [g.sup.-1]) (%) July 2.19 5.79 57.73 10.86 (Summer) May 11.58 5.82 542.43 22.92 (Spring) TABLE 3.
The sediment trap samples indicated that the subsequent rapid gonadal growth coincided with increased food availability.
Providing a sediment trap outside the navigation channel or harbor area is sometimes feasible under certain specific natural conditions.
While forest buffers can to some degree mimic the role once played by the watershed's vast forests, they can never replace the massive nutrient sponge and sediment trap of past forests.
NFPA [sections] 5.5.6 requires that a sediment trap or drip leg be installed on all gas systems that run uphill or "upstream" to the automatic controls, such as on a furnace or water heater.
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