sedition

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sedition

(sĭdĭ`shən), in law, acts or words tending to upset the authority of a government. The scope of the offense was broad in early common law, which even permitted prosecution for a remark insulting to the king. Although there have been several statutes in the United States forbidding seditious utterances and writings, the protection guaranteed to speech and press by the First Amendment to the Constitution has made them difficult to enforce except during periods of great national stress. The Sedition Act of 1798 generated so much opposition (see Alien and Sedition ActsAlien and Sedition Acts,
1798, four laws enacted by the Federalist-controlled U.S. Congress, allegedly in response to the hostile actions of the French Revolutionary government on the seas and in the councils of diplomacy (see XYZ Affair), but actually designed to destroy Thomas
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) that similar statutes were not enacted until the 20th cent. During World War I the Espionage Act (1917) and the Sedition Act (1918) punished speeches and writings that interfered with the war effort or caused contempt for the government. Vaguely worded and broadly interpreted, they resulted in over 2,000 prosecutions, mostly against radicals and the radical press. The Smith Act of 1940, restricted in scope to the advocacy of violence against the government, was invoked only infrequently during World War II, though it was later used successfully to prosecute Communist party leaders, as in Dennis v. United States (1951). The libellibel and slander,
in law, types of defamation. In common law, written defamation was libel and spoken defamation was slander. Today, however, there are no such clear definitions.
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 decision of Sullivan v. New York Times (1964), by granting special protection to criticism of public officials, largely eliminated what remained of the crime of sedition in the United States.

sedition

1. an offence that tends to undermine the authority of a state
2. an incitement to public disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) The subplot of the seditionist movement depicted in the novel has its historical referents in the figures and events connected with "El Plan dc San Diego," written by agents of then Mexican president Venustiano Carranza in 1915.
Their ability to unseat a minister--on the pretext that he was too close to the "seditionists" of the 2009 election; appointed people with seditionist backgrounds to high administrative and university positions; reinstated some of the professors fired by Ahmadinejad's ministry; and "failed" in confronting "antirevolutionary activities" at the universities--is as much a setback for the Rouhani administration as it is for the Parliament's conservative leadership in leading and controlling its own ranks.
With my usual sense of selfless service to dictators, seditionists and the traveling public, I have collected arcane facts about Switzerland not found anywhere except on Wikipedia, and even a few which you can only learn by going there.
In Qom, Friday prayer leader Mohammad Saeedi said, "The people expect the authorities to deal with these seditionists firmly and quickly.
I quoted the late Iran president who said that "if the two countries (Iran and Saudi Arabia) are harmonized on regional issues and the Islamic world, seditionists will not be able to induce differences between Muslims."
Marchers were carrying posters saying, "No to riots," "Iran is not Syria" and "Death to seditionists", as well as portraits of Khamenei.
The demonstrators waved Iranian flags and pictures of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and placards saying "Death to seditionists."
Security forces fired tear gas and made arrests and the protesters were eventually replaced by a larger crowd of pro-government students who chanted "death to the seditionists" as they took back control of the gates.
The rationale behind the establishment of the DSBs was that it was the home town or village where the loyalty of the serving and ex-soldiers was impaired when they were approached by seditionists and came in touch with seditious propaganda.35 In fact after the First World War the provincial economy had deteriorated and commodity prices had shot up.
That the "putschists," meaning the post-coup Egyptian regime, are worse than the Khawarij--a despised early Muslim sect--and were worse than seditionists, as they pose a grave danger to the Ummah, or global Muslim community.
Her book presents a multifarious crowd of protesters--"communists, seditionists, secessionists, revolutionaries, dreamers, idlers, crackheads, crackpots, all manner of freelancers, and wise men"--who gather near Delhi's Jantar Mantar.
After all, we fallible creatures could just as easily be led systematically astray by sophists and seditionists.