seed coat


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seed coat

[′sēd ‚kōt]
(botany)
The envelope which encloses the seed except for a tiny pore, the micropyle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tempeh and soybean seed coat, which were acquired commercially and hand-picked at Sentra Tahu Tempeh Primkopti (Lenteng Agung, South Jakarta, Indonesia), were used as samples.
[18] reported that beans with lighter seed coats had lower cooking times than those with red or purple seed coat colors.
Brassica juncea and Sinapis arvensis had round plump or shriveled seed shape and the seed size was 1.2-2 x 1.1-1.7 mm, seed coat color was tan, brown, dark brown, or yellow (Wang et.al., 2013).
The aerial part and seed coat extracts displayed similar values (91.46 ppm to 106.1 ppm) (Table 2).
Different seed coat colours exert differential germination-restrictive actions by providing different levels of impermeability to water and/or oxygen or the mechanical resistance to radicle protrusion (Debeaujon, Leon-Kloosterziel, & Koornneef, 2000).
The chief protective function for the embryo with unspecialized seed coat (thin-walled and collapsed cells) seems to be exercised by the pericarp wall of the cypsela (achene).
Although hard seed coat improves the survival of seeds in the soil especially in adverse environmental conditions and helps to avoid extinction of species in nature, it may prevent use of plant cultivars or wild-type relatives for agricultural or breeding purposes [20,21].
* Drugs that fight HMGB1 are potentially years away from practical use; however, extracts from mung bean seed coat and green tea offer safe, natural anti-HMGB1 therapy--and they are available for oral use now.
In addition, the seed margin, a specialised part of the seed coat in mature seeds, exhibited the same structural differences as seed coats in hulled vs.
Imbibition is a strictly physical process, and depends on the difference in water potential between the seed and its environment, the protein, lipid and starch composition of the seed, and the permeability of the seed coat (Nelson, 2004).
However, because most iron is in the seed coat, a significant maternal effect was observed for the iron concentration in the common bean seeds (JOST et al., 2009b).
The seed coat often remained attached to seedlings in coyote ingested seeds, which appeared to damage the young plants and affect post-emergence growth.