seed coat


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seed coat

[′sēd ‚kōt]
(botany)
The envelope which encloses the seed except for a tiny pore, the micropyle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, each treatment that break the seed coat and induce entrance of water in to the seed can increase the germination percentage of flower of an hour.
The seeds exhibited two distinct types of seed coat color, one white to light gray with black markings (mottled), and the other a solid light brown without markings (uniformly colored).
Cultivars with IITT genotype frequently have dull gray-brown discoloration over the entire seed coat especially when cultivated under cool summer conditions (Cober et al.
The following pregerminative treatments were carried out untreated seeds (T1), and totally scarified seeds (T2) using sulfuric acid (96 %) for 4 hours, washing and manual elimination of seed coat debris (Munoz 1998).
This thick seed coat has another benefit for both plant and humans, as it keeps the hidden embryo alive for seven to ten years; thus, even without refrigeration seeds were preserved in a viable state for many years.
A similar conclusion was reached by Costa (7), who first examined seed coat distributions.
7 buffer were effective in rapidly overcoming the hydrophobic character of the seed coat.
Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) studies of seed coat characteristics have been quiet useful in evaluating taxonomic relationships within the Scrophulariaceae.
Anandarajah also noted that for dried plant embryos without seed coats (artificial seeds), the taking up of water (imbibition) is spontaneous ".
This helps prevent seed damage by fungus that may grow on the mucus-like coating around the seed coat.
Although the importance of the seed coat is recognized, molecular analysis of this structure is relatively recent (MOISE et al.
In addition during the production of artificial seed, one can study seed coat formation, a fusion of endosperm in embryo development and seed germination.