seed pod


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seed pod

a carpel or pistil enclosing the seeds of a plant, esp a flowering plant
References in periodicals archive ?
It tells of a seed pod, which aspires to become a giant tree so he could provide home for birds.
One clue came from the observation that Arabidopsis plants--which belong to the Brassicaceae (mustard or cabbage) family--mature and open their seed pods faster when grown at elevated temperatures, according to the study.
Seed pods were collected once they matured and turned brown.
Optimum condition for producing activated carbon (AC3) from Moringa oleifera seed pod was activated at 800degC using ZnCl2 as activating agent resulting BET surface area 853.68 m2g-1 and pore diameter 2.13 nm.
Black Bears (Ursus americanus) in southeastern Alaska forage intensively on seed pods and male and female catkins of Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), often breaking many branches from the trees.
"I've been paying attention to elements in the woods such as seed pods, buds, moss, grasses, leaves, sticks and stones.
The seed pod would then go on top to cover the "inner workings" of my key hanger.
The colorful moniker refers to its dried seed pods, which are large, black, and have sharp hooks that larch on to clothing or animals (see photo, Page 84).
enjoying the flowers or jumping in surprise at an exploding seed pod. take heed-poison ivy may be nearby!
Which country has a parliament called the seed pod of a tree-climbing orchid?
Which food flavouring is produced from the seed pod of a tree-climbing orchid?
Cardamom An aromatic seed pod which comes in three varieties: white, green and large black.